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T-L Irrigation Co. Introduces Pro Version Of Precision Point Touch Pivot Controller

T-L Irrigation Co. introduces Precision Point Touch Pro, an add-on board combined with a firmware upgrade that dials up simplicity, options and functionality for pivot system controls while decluttering the irrigation workspace.

The Pro board, which can be retrofitted to an existing Touch system or added as an option to a new pivot, combines into one simplified package:

• Water pump control
• Water-pressure triggered start
• Two additional auxiliary equipment controls
• Water pressure monitoring
• Detailed safety readouts for easy troubleshooting
• USB datalogging of multiple system parameters
• Load control
• Telemetry connect-ability

“Precision Point Touch Pro gathers functions once requiring several different systems and external hardware together into one simple, efficient full color touch-screen controller. Plus, the two auxiliary relays allow for greater flexibility and more precise management of the irrigation system as a whole,” says John Thom, T-L Irrigation Co. Vice President.

Besides eliminating the complication and expense of external hardware systems, Precision Point Touch Pro adds capabilities such as water pressure monitoring and management.

“You get a direct readout of water pressure on the panel,” says Neal Schlautman, T-L Irrigation Co. engineering manager. “You can also set a specific psi for the system to build to before the pivot kicks on, assuring the system is irrigating when it starts moving.

Safety inputs deliver specific readouts for troubleshooting. “It’s not just a ‘check-engine’ light, it’s a diagnosis of where the problem is,” Thom says.

Additional auxiliary relays that allow for specific degree inputs for turn on and shutoff makes it easy to dial in precise pivot management.

“A chemigation pump can be controlled to be on for corn and turn off when the pivot reaches the preprogramed spot where a split field switches to soybeans,” Thom says. The original Precision Point Touch has two end gun controls. With the Pro system, a producer can easily tie into the extra relays to control individual spans or an entire half of a pivot.

“The Pro panel upgrade just makes the whole irrigation process work seamlessly together,” Thom says.

About T-L Irrigation Co.
T-L Irrigation Co. is a family-owned irrigation solutions business based in Hastings, Neb. For 67 years they’ve been committed to providing reliable and high-quality center pivots, irrigation systems, agriculture and irrigation equipment, and innovative water management products that are intuitive for farmers to use and repair. They distribute throughout the United States and to 80 countries. For more information visit www.tlirr.com.

ADAMA’s Max-Ace Herbicide Tolerance Technology For Rice Approved By Canadian Health Agency

The Max-Ace Cropping Solution with Highcard released by RiceTec and ADAMA has officially received approval by the Canadian Health Agency’s Feed and Food Divisions for commercial use. This authorization now allows for unrestricted planting of and harvesting of Max-Ace rice products.

This herbicide tolerant technology with Highcard herbicide gives rice growers an excellent tool for weed control, high-yield, a rice rotation alternative to the FullPage Rice Cropping Solution and conventional offerings from RiceTec. Max-Ace with Highcard is now available for the 2022 growing season with two primary Max-Ace products being released: RTv7231 MA and RT7331 MA.

“Demo fields of Max-Ace in the 2021 season showed high potential for yield,” said Mason Wallace , RiceTec Technical Service Manager. “With yield advantages ranging from 31% to 49%, growers have been pleased with the performance of Max-Ace with Highcard as a profitable crop and technology rotational tool.”

The Max-Ace technology takes advantage of a unique, non-GMO trait that gives the rice enhanced tolerance to the Highcard herbicide. Highcard features a proprietary safener which grants enhanced tolerance to Max-Ace rice while providing excellent postemergence control of a broad spectrum of difficult to control grass weeds including red and weedy rice and IMI-resistant weeds.

“Herbicide performance in this year’s field plots has demonstrated that Highcard provided crop safety and effective weed control in Max-Acre rice,” said Dave Feist, ADAMA US Product Strategy Leader. “We are excited to be bringing this new proprietary safened herbicide to market alongside RiceTec.”

To meet stewardship requirements and maximize the effectiveness and longevity of this technology for rice growers, Highcard needs to be applied sequentially both early (2-leaf or later) and before panicle initiation.

To learn more about Max-Ace Rice Cropping Solution with Highcard herbicide, talk to your local RiceTec sales representative or visit www.ricetec.com.

Ag Tech Developer Skyward Apps Expands Its Developers’ Training On Software Security Risks

Skyward Apps, a top-tier agriculture technology firm, has put its software engineers through training on the Top 10 software security vulnerabilities, as defined by the global Open Web Application Security Project.

Skyward’s additional training comes amidst a sharp uptick in ransomware attacks on the agriculture food supply chain, which has disrupted farm operations, equipment, food processing, and distribution.

“We have always had multiple sets of eyes review every piece of software we develop, but the protection of our clients’ interests-as well as our own-is paramount,” said CEO Kat Crawford. “Agriculture is now a high-tech business, which brings with it both benefits and risks.”

Agriculture is regarded as highly vulnerable to cyber threats due to the complexity of integrating data from farm equipment, sensors, GPS and automation systems, including legacy systems without updated security controls. Another issue is the overall lack of security awareness throughout the sector.

“The theme of Cybersecurity Awareness Month is ‘Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart’, which is what we strive to do year-round,” said Skyward CTO Nick Elliott. “We systematically check for errors and vulnerabilities as part of our code reviews, automated and manual testing processes.”

The 2021 list of most critical software security risks include three new categories:
• Insecure Design – the result of software design flaws
• Software and Data Integrity Failures – the result of inadequate security controls
• Server-side request forgery – the result of a security bug that allows malicious server requests without validation

The full OWASP Top 10 checklist can be found here.

Winners For The 2021 National Wheat Foundation’s Yield Contest Announced

he National Wheat Foundation’s (NWF) National Wheat Yield Contest (NWYC) offers growers the opportunity to compete with farmers from across the United States and improve their production practices through new and innovative techniques. Today, NWF is happy to announce the national winners for the 2021 National Wheat Yield Contest. See who won and read more about their entries here!

“Better than expected” is how many of the grower participants describe their 2021 wheat crops. The crops in the spring wheat areas overcame historic drought and a heatwave that is being described as a 1000-year weather event. The winter wheat crop experienced the “Valentine’s Week Historic Winter Outbreak” of snow, sleet, freezing rain and extremely cold temperatures that lasted for several days. In the Northeast, the rain was plentiful and too much so during harvest time. Despite these challenges, 387 wheat growers still entered the contest and 150 of them took their entries to yield in order to compete and see how they fared versus other growers in the country.

Wheat growers are resilient and hopeful by nature. The challenge of growing better wheat than they did the year before motivates them to try new management practices, varieties, and techniques. We know the winners appreciate the prize of being recognized, but more importantly, learn and improve their wheat yields and quality every season.

“NWF would like to thank each grower for enrolling in the NWYC and thank our sponsors for helping to make the Contest available to wheat growers in the United States. Entries for the Contest were 387 this year, spring wheat entries were down a little, due to the drought,” stated National Wheat Foundation Board Chairman, David Cleavinger. “Yields and quality were excellent in this year’s entries and contestants tell us they are continuing to learn how to increase their yields and quality on their farms.”

The contest recognizes winners in two primary competition categories: winter wheat and spring wheat, and two subcategories: dryland and irrigated. Grain must be Grade 1 or 2 by Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS) standards to be eligible for awards. National winners will receive a trip to the Commodity Classic in New Orleans, LA in March 2022 and be recognized at an awards reception.

The sponsors for the 2021 National Yield Contest are AgriMaxx, Ardent Mills, BASF, Croplan/Winfield, Elevate Ag, Grain Craft, GrainSense, John Deere, Miller Milling, Michigan Wheat, Nutrien, Ohio Corn and Wheat, and WestBred.

Winter Wheat – Dryland
William Willard MD Bin Buster
Jeffery Krohn MI 1st
Brian Kreider PA 2nd
Douglas Goyings OH 3rd
Michael Ebelhar KY 4th
Tyler Ediger KS 5th

Winter Wheat – Dryland % Increase
Travis Freeburg NE 1st
Shawn Kimbrell TX 2nd
Zach Balahtsis OK 3rd
Kenneth O’Neal TX 4th
Matt Jaeger KS 5th

Spring Wheat – Dryland
John Hofer ND Bin Buster
Dallas Diesen MN 1st
Robert Holzwarth SD 2nd
Bruce Anderson ND 3rd

Spring Wheat – Dryland % Increase
Greg Messer ND 1st
Chris Carlson ND 2nd
Jordan Christman ND 3rd

Winter Wheat – Irrigated
Steven VanGrunsven OR Bin Buster
Rylee Reynolds ID 1st
Joel Zwainz WA 2nd

Spring Wheat – Irrigated
Phillip Gross WA Bin Buster
Boe Clausen WA 1st
Dallin Wilcox ID 2nd

*It should be noted winners are selected by the percentage increase their yield exceeds the most recent 5-year Olympic County average as determined by USDA.

For more details on the winning entries and to review the official rules and entry details for the 2022 contest, visit yieldcontest.wheatfoundation.org.

National Corn Growers Assn, 50 Other Ag Groups, Comment On Disruptive Factors Facing U.S. Supply Chain

The National Corn Growers Association joined 51 other agricultural groups in submitting comments this week to the U.S. Department of Transportation addressing the many disruptive factors facing the U.S. supply chain. The comments provide recommendations on how to alleviate these challenges through legislative and regulatory actions.

“To be successful, farmers must have a reliable and fully functioning national transportation system that will allow us to receive our fall fertilizer shipments and deliver our products to consumers in a timely fashion,” said NCGA President Chris Edgington. “That’s why NCGA, along with other groups, are making our voices heard in these discussions.”

The comments address several key areas of concern to corn growers, including:

• Inland Waterways. The inland waterways system is vital to the American supply chain and gives U.S. producers a significant advantage in terms of cost and efficiency over international competitors. The comments urge the administration to prioritize legislative and regulatory actions that promote the rehabilitation of aging waterway infrastructure on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois River. This includes the addition of seven 1,200-foot locks on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway as part of the Navigation Ecosystem Sustainability Program.

• Rail Competition and Service. The comments mention the value of promoting competition in rail transportation and the cost saving outcomes such actions would have on U.S. grain shippers and receivers. The comments encourage the Surface Transportation Board to consider a regulation which would allow for the use of “reciprocal” or “competitive switching.” Competitive switching would enable shippers and receivers geographically beholden to one rail carrier to gain access to a second rail carrier through a short distance “switch.” NCGA supports a competitive and nondiscriminatory rate structure for our nation’s railroads.

• Motor Carrier Freight Transportation Efficiency. The comments recommend a few key actions that could help alleviate the disruption in the U.S. motor carrier freight transportation sector. One of our recommendations, for example, was that USDA and the U.S. Department of Transportation continue to coordinate to ensure agricultural haulers and the rest of the trucking industry have the flexibilities needed to provide timely delivery of essential products. Flexibilities such as relief from Hours-of-Service requirements have been critical over the last 18 months.

NCGA’s actions come on the heels of President Biden’s announcement that the Port of Los Angeles would begin to operate 24 hours, seven days a week. This move could potentially mitigate the bottleneck of goods on the west coast awaiting distribution throughout the country.

Study Reports 80% Of Midwest Farmers In Solid Cash Position

For nearly a year, the rural economy has shown consistent growth, according to the Creighton University Rural Mainstreet Index (RMI).

For October 2021, the RMI rose to 66.1, which is up from September’s 62.5. The index ranges between 0 and 100 with a reading of 50 representing growth neutral.

“Solid grain prices, the Federal Reserve’s record-low interest rates, and growing exports have underpinned the Rural Mainstreet Economy,” says Ernie Goss, who chairs Creighton’s Heider College of Business and leads the RMI. “USDA data show 2021 year-to-date agriculture exports are more than 25% above that for the same period in 2020. This has been an important factor supporting the Rural Mainstreet economy.”

 

 

Around eight of 10 bankers report farmers in their areas were in solid cash position with little need for borrowing. The remaining 18% of bankers reported farmer cash positions little changed from past years.

The October loan volume index fell to 53.6 from September’s 58.9.

However, Steve Simon, CEO of South Story Bank in Slater-Huxley, Iowa, shared, “Year-end borrowing as farmers look to pre-pay rising input costs.”

 

 

Farmland prices condition to accelerate. The region’s farmland price index slid to a very strong 81.5 from September’s record 85.2. October’s reading represented the 14th straight month that the index has moved above growth neutral.

The October farm equipment-sales index slipped to a strong 64.8 from 66 in September. Readings over the last several months represent the strongest consistent growth since 2012.

Bank CEOs indicated that congestion at domestic transportation hubs represented the greatest supply chain disruption for farmers. Other key challenges include bottlenecks at processors and delays for purchasing inputs and equipment.

 

 

The confidence index, which reflects bank CEO expectations for the economy six months out sank for the fourth straight month to 51.8, its lowest level since November of last year, and down from September’s much stronger 65.4.

The RMI, which started in 2005, represents an early snapshot of the economy of rural agricultural and energy-dependent portions of the nation. It focuses on 200 rural communities with an average population of 1,300.

USDA To Make Up To $1.15 Billion Available To Help People Living In Rural Communities Access High-Speed Internet

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced a significant expansion of access to high-speed internet, health care and educational services for millions of rural Americans nationwide. Today’s announcement continues to move forward President Biden’s Build Back Better Agenda by prioritizing economic growth in rural America and investing in the backbone of our country – the middle class.

“For too long, the ‘digital divide’ has left too many people living in rural communities behind: unable to compete in the global economy and unable to access the services and resources that all Americans need,” Vilsack said. “As we build back better than we were before, the actions I am announcing today will go a long way toward ensuring that people who live or work in rural areas are able to tap into the benefits of broadband, including access to specialized health care, educational opportunities and the global marketplace. Rural people, businesses and communities must have affordable, reliable, high-speed internet so they can fully participate in modern society and the modern economy.”

Background: ReConnect Program
Secretary Vilsack spoke about USDA’s commitment to helping rural Americans get improved access to broadband and health care during a visit to the newly renovated emergency department at Hammond Henry Hospital. The project was financed in part by a USDA loan.

He announced that on November 24 USDA will begin accepting applications for up to $1.15 billion in loans and grants to expand the availability of broadband in rural areas. USDA is making the funding available through the ReConnect Program.

To be eligible for ReConnect Program funding, an applicant must serve an area without broadband service at speeds of 100 megabits per second (Mbps) (download) and 20 Mbps (upload), and commit to building facilities capable of providing broadband service at speeds of 100 Mbps (download and upload) to every location in its proposed service area. In making funding decisions, USDA will prioritize projects that will serve low-density rural areas with locations lacking internet access services at speeds of at least 25 Mbps (download) and 3 Mbps (upload).

In making funding decisions, the USDA will also consider, among other things, the economic needs of the community to be served; the extent which a provider will offer affordable service options; a project’s commitment to strong labor standards; and whether a project is serving tribal lands or is submitted by a local government, Tribal Government, non-profit or cooperative.

USDA has simplified the application process and has expanded the program significantly. For example, ReConnect will now offer 100 percent grants for certain projects on tribal lands and in socially vulnerable communities.

The Department plans to make available up to $200 million in ReConnect Program loans, up to $250 million in loan/grant combinations, up to $350 million in grants with a 25 percent matching requirement, and up to $350 million in grants with no matching requirement for projects in tribal and socially vulnerable communities.

Background: Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grants
Vilsack also announced today a $50 million investment in 105 rural distance learning and telemedicine (PDF, 224 KB) projects in 37 states and Puerto Rico. These awards are being funded through USDA’s Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) program. This program helps fund distance learning and telemedicine services in rural areas to increase access to education, training and health care resources that are otherwise limited or unavailable.

USDA’s distance learning and telemedicine investment includes a $387,000 grant to OSF Healthcare System to help establish a telehealth network for 107,000 rural residents in central Illinois. Additionally, UHS of Texoma, Inc. is receiving a $199,015 grant to implement a distance learning system to improve mental health services for 8,000 people in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nation in Oklahoma.

For additional information on the upcoming ReConnect Program funding opportunity, see the Oct. 22, 2021, Federal Register (PDF, 319 KB). Once the application window opens, applications must be submitted through USDA Rural Development’s online application system on the ReConnect webpage. All required materials for completing an application are included in the online system.

To learn more about ReConnect Program eligibility, technical assistance and recent announcements, visit www.usda.gov/reconnect.

Under the Biden-Harris Administration, Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities, create jobs and improve the quality of life for millions of Americans in rural areas.

This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural, Tribal and high-poverty areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov. If you’d like to subscribe to USDA Rural Development updates, visit our GovDelivery subscriber page.

COVID-19 and demand for e-commerce

COVID-19 has accelerated the uptake of online food shopping.

‘Consumer behaviour and attitudes towards food purchasing changed quickly and dramatically because of the pandemic,’ says Jeewani Fernando, provincial consumer market analyst with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. ‘Despite the large volume of sales during the pandemic, there was a marked decline in multiple weekly grocery trips. These have been replaced by single large shopping trips and an increase in online purchasing.’

The latest Consumer Corner looks at how COVID-19 affected the demand for e-commerce. Fernando says many consumers tried online food shopping for the first time during the pandemic. Sales trends show that consumers have become more comfortable buying grocery and food products online.

Convenience is the main reason for online shopping followed by safety and health and other factors. However, consumer concerns about fees, the quality and selection of perishable items, and an immediate need for the groceries are some of the main challenges.

‘Retailers may consider expanding same-day delivery service or introducing annual subscription plans rather than using one-time delivery fees. They might also increase the availability of curbside pickup to alleviate some of the concerns and to drive more online shopping.’

Pandemic restrictions on restaurant capacity and reluctance among many diners to frequent indoor public places have shifted food service and drinking places to offer more contactless delivery and take-out options, and many have made investments to expand their online sales capabilities. Consumers stayed home and used various platforms to find restaurants and order in meals in 2020.

‘Using e-commerce to purchase food still has strong growth potential in Canada, given the significant growth in both supply and demand during the pandemic in 2020. These industry insights may help Alberta food retailers and food service providers to better manage their food product offerings in the post-pandemic era,’ says Fernando.

Read the latest Consumer Corner on COVID-19 and the demand for e-commerce.

Federal Reserve: Observations on the Ag Economy- October 2021

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve Board released its October 2021 Beige Book update, a summary of commentary on current economic conditions by Federal Reserve District. The report included several observations pertaining to the U.S. agricultural economy.

Graph of Fed Districts from, “The Beige Book.”

* Sixth District- Atlanta– “Agricultural conditions remained mixed. Widespread rain kept the District free of drought, but left parts of the District in abnormally moist to excessively wet conditions.

Producers continued to assess damages from Hurricane Ida; initial estimates indicated damage to row and vegetable crops, sugarcane, timber, livestock, and infrastructure.

“On a year-over-year basis, production forecasts for corn, soybean, peanut, and cotton crops were up while rice and sugarcane forecasts were down. The USDA reported year-over-year prices paid to farmers in August were up for corn, cotton, soybeans, cattle, broilers, and eggs, but down for rice and milk. On a month-over-month basis, prices were up for corn, rice, cattle, broilers, and eggs but down for cotton, soybeans, and milk.”

* Seventh District- Chicago– “In spite of drought in some areas, corn and soybean harvests in the District were larger than expected and near record levels. More plentiful supplies of both crops were putting downward pressure on prices. That said, corn and soybean prices were higher than a year ago. Cattle prices were flat, while milk prices recovered some. Facing higher feed costs, dairy farm margins tightened.

Rising energy prices and logistical problems were creating concerns about the cost and availability for 2022.

Farmland prices and rents continued to grow.

“Cash from government programs and product sales were holding back demand for agricultural lending.”

Eighth District- St. Louis– Agriculture conditions have slightly improved since our previous report. Overall crop yields have increased moderately over the previous year. Contacts are very optimistic about the current conditions in the District. Farmers have reported a strong harvest season combined with high prices, which have contributed to a strong season overall. Hurricane Ida caused some slight delays but was not a major disruption to the District’s agribusiness. There is, however, some concern about rising input prices, global supply chain disruptions, and the lack of labor necessary for both low- and high-skilled agriculture work.”

* Ninth District- Minneapolis– “District agricultural conditions deteriorated somewhat since the previous report. While producers continued to benefit from solid commodity prices, most of the District remained in severe or worse drought condition. Yields and production of wheat and other small grain crops in District states for 2021 will be sharply lower than the previous year.

Agricultural Statistics Board Briefing. Small Grains and Stocks, USDA- National Agricultural Statistics Service (September 2021).

“Most of the District’s corn and soybean crops were rated in fair or poor condition.”

* Tenth District- Kansas City– “Conditions in the Tenth District agricultural sector remained strong.  Prices of corn, soybeans and hogs decreased slightly since August, but, along with wheat and cotton prices, remained at multi-year highs.  Contacts reported ongoing concerns about rising inputs costs putting downward pressure on farm incomes in coming months.

“Some contacts also noted a desire to hold larger inventories of inputs over the coming year.  Weakness in the cattle industry persisted as concerns about drought and higher input costs intensified.  Low cattle prices continued to limit profit margins for ranchers.”

* Eleventh District- Dallas– “Soil conditions remained mostly adequate in Texas, though drought conditions persisted in parts of southern New Mexico. Crop conditions were quite favorable, boosting expectations for substantially higher production this year than last across a variety of crops, including cotton, sorghum, and corn. Agricultural prices generally softened slightly over the reporting period. Pasture conditions were fair to good, and promising soil moisture conditions for the planting of winter wheat increased optimism for crop performance.”

Twelfth District- San Francisco– “Conditions in the agriculture and resource sectors strengthened somewhat. Demand for the regions’ agricultural products continued to be robust both domestically and internationally. Crop yields on tree fruit, wheat, and grapes were lower due to warmer temperatures and water shortages. A few contacts reported farmers leaving a portion of their acreage fallow to use water on more profitable crops. As a result, some fruit inventories were reduced. Several contacts noted price pressures coming from increased transportation and labor costs. Some producers in the Pacific Northwest highlighted that labor shortages led them to hire most of their seasonal workers through the temporary workers visa program as opposed to locally. Supply chain disruptions and shipping delays continued to weigh on producers with one contact reporting about 25 percent of orders being unshipped.”

Source: Farm Policy News

Herbicide Shortage – How To Plan For The 2022 Growing Season

There is a lot of speculation about a herbicide shortage for the 2022 growing season, which will impact weed management decisions starting with fall applications.  The two main active ingredients that we’re hearing about right now are glyphosate (Roundup, others) and glufosinate (Liberty, others), both associated with an increase in cost.  There will likely be limited supplies of other pesticide active ingredients as well, but in the short term, a shortage of these two active ingredients poses some major challenges for corn and soybean production.  The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to minimize the impact of herbicide shortage on corn and soybean production in the Midwest.  As you search for alternatives to these two herbicides you may have already determined that weed control guides produced by University Extension and Industry will become your most important tool for planning your herbicide purchases for many years to come.  To access the Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, follow this link – https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/2021-weed-control-guide-for-ohio-indiana-and-illinois/.

First, what is causing the shortage?  There are several different factors which are impacting this issue. In no particular order, the reasons for the herbicide shortage include a decline in number of laborers to unload tanker ships at gulf ports, lack of truck transportation from the ports to get the ingredients to U.S. formulation plants or formulated products to the retailers, reduced supplies of some of the inert ingredients of the formulation, shortages of materials to make containers and packaging, and Hurricane Ida that damaged a glyphosate production plant in Luling, LA (https://www.agweb.com/news/business/technology/hurricane-ida-idles-largest-glyphosate-production-plant-us).

Regardless of the cause, it is also important to consider herbicide costs. We are hearing that glyphosate prices will be in excess of $80/gallon.  So, even if there is not a shortage, you should plan your weed control strategies for the next growing season to accommodate a limited availability because of supply or price of these two active ingredients.

It is important to point out that the demand for glyphosate will be considerably less in a conventional till system then in a no-till system.  Glyphosate is arguably the most important herbicide that facilitates no-till crop production.  It’s even more important in systems where cover crops are used and need to be terminated before corn or soybean planting.  Therefore, one simple way to reduce reliance on glyphosate is to simply go back to using tillage for fall and early spring weed control.  This practice will be very effective for controlling the weeds emerged at the time of tillage, but some farm operations may not be set up for the extra equipment, labor, and fuel needed to do this on a widespread basis.  In addition, replacing burndown herbicides with tillage threatens soil conservation practices.  Glufosinate demand, on the other hand, will not be impacted as much by choice of tillage system since we don’t use glufosinate in our fall or spring burndown application, and not much is used in corn.  There is some glufosinate used in delayed burndown situations.  However, we mostly use glufosinate postemergence in soybeans after the crop and summer annual weeds have emerged.

If you’re not interested in returning to widespread use of tillage, keep in mind that you are looking for ways to control winter annual weeds before planting and control grass weeds with other herbicides to decrease reliance on glyphosate for postemergence grass weed control.  Secondly, regardless of tillage system, you want to build a solid residual program as the backbone of your weed control strategy to reduce reliance on using glyphosate postemergence in the crops.  In the next section of this article, we will outline some weed control considerations based on the type of tillage system you are in and the weeds to be controlled at different times of the year.

Figure 1. Sprayer (Photo Credit: Fred Whitford)

Figure 1. Herbicide mixtures and application parameters will become even more important when dealing with shortages of our most popular herbicides. (Photo Credit: Fred Whitford)

Fall Applied Herbicides for Winter Annuals on No-Till Ground

If you are a cover crop user, plant high biomass producing covers that include cereal rye for horseweed suppression.  Suppression of winter annuals other than horseweed can be somewhat variable, but we usually have better results if biomass production is high in the fall.  If legumes are not planted with the cereal rye, we can also use 2,4-D or dicamba in the fall to control winter annual broadleaf weeds that emerge before winter freeze up.  Weed control benefits from high biomass cover crops can also be realized for the 2022 growing season as well.  We occasionally see some suppression of waterhemp and annual grasses as well with high biomass cover crops.

If you are not a cover crop user and you use fall applied herbicides for winter annuals, consider taking out glyphosate and just using 2,4-D + dicamba mixtures this fall IF you only have broadleaf weeds [chickweed, henbit/deadnettle, shepherd’s purse, field pennycress, mustard species, cressleaf groundsel, dandelion (which is a perennial), poison hemlock (a biennial), etc.] in your fields.  If you have grass weeds (annual bluegrass, Carolina foxtail, false timothy, others), and they are small and actively growing, you can use reduced rates of glyphosate to control the grasses and rely on 2,4-D + dicamba mixtures to control the broadleaf weeds.  Keep in mind that if you mix reduced rates of glyphosate with 2,4-D, dicamba or both, grass control can be compromised (herbicide antagonism).  So, make those applications on a warm day and be sure to add AMS to the mix to minimize the risk of herbicide antagonism.  In addition, we have observed that the addition of saflufenacil (Sharpen, others), can help speed the activity of glyphosate on some annual grass species.  Again, if you are reducing the rate of glyphosate to conserve your supply, adding a saflufenacil product might improve the activity of glyphosate.  Remember to use MSO and a nitrogen source with saflufenacil for optimum foliar activity.

There are other active ingredients that provide some control or suppression of winter annual grass weeds and can be used in the fall, such as paraquat, clethodim (Select, others) and rimsulfuron (Resolve, Basis, Crusher, others).  These herbicides will be a bit more limited in the spectrum of weeds controlled compared to glyphosate.  Therefore, make sure to properly identify the weeds present in the field and check if the weed species found are listed on labels of these products.  Paraquat is commonly used with metribuzin (Sencor, TriCor, others) and 2,4-D or dicamba for fields going to soybean.  For fields going to corn paraquat + simazine (Princep, others) + 2,4-D or dicamba would be an effective broadspectrum treatment.  If you are using a clethodim or rimsulfuron product instead of paraquat, add 2,4-D or dicamba to help with broadleaf weeds.

Spring Applied Herbicides for Winter Annuals and Early Emerging Summer Annuals on No-Till Ground

For no-till corn acres, we have to design a program to 1) control the winter annual and early spring summer annual weeds that have emerged, 2) fit the crop being grown that summer, and 3) factor in the fairly long list of residual premixes that might have some combination of atrazine, isoxaflutole, mesotrione, rimsulfuron or thiencarbazone, metribuzin, or saflufenacil in them.  All these herbicides have some foliar activity on early spring weeds and fit into a no-till burndown scenario.  Isoxaflutole, rimsulfuron, and thiencarbazone have foliar and residual activity on grasses and will control a few selected broadleaf weeds.  Metribuzin, saflufenacil, and mesotrione have foliar and residual activity on a key no-till weed, horseweed (aka marestail), and can also help with waterhemp and Palmer amaranth control.  A group 15 herbicide (metolachlor, dimethenamid, pyroxasulfone, acetochlor) is also needed to form the backbone of the soil residual grass and small seeded broadleaf weed control program for the season.

As we get closer to the 2022 growing season and start planning for control of summer annual weeds it will be important to assess your supply of these active ingredients and build the backbone of your weed control program around full rates of residual herbicides so you can minimize reliance on postemergence herbicides.  As mentioned in the introduction, there are many good references available to help you determine which residual herbicides best fit the weed species you are battling.  Consult the weed response table such as these to choose the best product for each specific field.  If you can build a weed control program that only requires one postemergence treatment of glyphosate or glufosinate, and possibly at a rate less than the maximum labeled rate, that will allow you to stretch glyphosate and glufosinate supplies over more acres.  However, don’t fall into the trap of thinking you only get one application of these herbicides so you should wait for the last weed flush before you spray.  With limited supply and increased costs, the best route is to use a reasonable rate on small weeds with the best adjuvant system and application method possible.  Use residual herbicides to manage other weed flushes.

Here are a few scenarios to consider based on the problematic weeds in a specific field.  Keep in mind we do not endorse any specific product or company.  We are simply pointing out which products, based on the active ingredients they contain, would be a good fit with the weed pressure we have mentioned.  All the University Extension weed control guides and most of the guides written by the crop protection industry have weed efficacy tables in them to help the user determine which products provide acceptable control of the most common weeds in the specific geographical area covered by the guide.  Of course, these guides assume all herbicide label recommendations are followed for the application and herbicide resistance in the weed population has been considered.

Example 1.  A no-till corn field with lots of annual bluegrass or Carolina foxtail, and summer annual grass pressure.  If the grasses are 3 inches or less in height, and you have a limited supply of glyphosate, consider using this combination for your burndown treatment – Corvus or Revulin Q at a full labeled rate.  The thiencarbazone + isoxaflutole in Corvus or the rimsulfuron + mesotrione in Revulin Q will control small annual grasses.  Add atrazine (1 to 1.5 lb ai/A) and possibly a group 15 herbicide to boost residual broadleaf and grass weed control.  If you have some emerged broadleaf weeds present when the burndown treatment is made, add saflufenacil, 2,4-D or dicamba to the mixture.  For weeds that break through the residual treatment, use a postemergence treatment of glufosinate + dicamba or glyphosate + dicamba and add a 1/3 to ½ label rate of the atrazine premix products that contains a group 15 herbicide to lengthen the window of residual weed control in the crop.  We know many growers won’t use glufosinate in corn since it isn’t always clear what hybrids are Liberty Link and they want to save the glufosinate for soybeans.  You can also use Revulin Q, Realm Q, Armezon, Armezon PRO, Impact or Laudis for postemergence grass control if glyphosate or glufosinate is not available.

Example 2.  What if the field in example 1 will be planted to soybean, rather than corn and is also infested with horseweed and waterhemp?  The good news here is that there are several premixes available that have metribuzin in them.  We have always observed better activity out of paraquat by adding a triazine herbicide to it and by simply adding paraquat and 2,4-D to a premix that has metribuzin in it, you have a ready-made, broadspectrum burndown and residual herbicide.  The soybean premixed products that would fit this scenario include Authority MTZ, Canopy, Dimetric Charged, Intimidator, Matador, Boundary/Moccasin MTZ.  The second choice would be to use clethodim for grasses + other herbicides to control broadleaf weeds.  Clethodim can be used for emerged grasses, but activity will be slower in cool weather conditions and can also be antagonized by other components of the mixture (2,4-D, dicamba, acetochlor).  Rimsulfuron can be used 30 days or more before planting soybean and may help with winter annual grasses, providing some residual control of summer annual grasses as well. Use of rimsulfuron would be best suited to STS or Bolt soybeans since they will be more tolerant to rimsulfuron.  The postemergence weed control program will be based on the soybean trait planted and the weeds that break through the residual herbicide.  Adding a group #15 residual herbicide (metolachlor, dimethenamid, pyroxasulfone, acetochlor) to the postemergence application will be the backbone of your small seeded broadleaf and grass control program, and reduce the need for a second postemergence application later in the growing season.

Example 3.  A no-till corn field with no winter annual grasses, but lots of horseweed (marestail), giant ragweed, and lambsquarters have started to emerge.  The field has a history of having some foxtail, fall panicum and waterhemp, but the summer annual grasses and waterhemp don’t emerge as early as the ragweed and lambsquarters.  Use Acuron, Lumax/Lexar, Resicore, or Verdict.  Add saflufenacil (not needed with Verdict since it contains saflufenacil), 2,4-D or dicamba to each of them for additional foliar activity on broadleaf weeds.  Add atrazine to Resicore or Verdict for additional residual control of broadleaf weeds. If summer annual grass weeds have emerged, add paraquat or a pint/A of glyphosate to the mixture.  If saflufenacil is added to one of the premixes that doesn’t contain saflufenacil, add 20-30 gallons of UAN (if corn has not emerged) and MSO for burndown of small grasses and broadleaves. For weeds that break through the residual treatment, use glufosinate + dicamba or glyphosate + dicamba and add a 1/3 to ½ label rate of the atrazine premix product that contains a group 15 herbicide to lengthen the window of residual weed control in the crop. You can also use Revulin Q, Realm Q, Armezon, Armezon PRO, Impact or Laudis for postemergence grass control if glyphosate or glufosinate is not available.

Example 4.  What if the field in Example 3 will be planted to soybean, rather than corn?  In this field, broadleaf weeds (winter and summer annuals) and horseweed are the target with the burndown treatment.  So, start of by determining which soybean trait will be planted.  If it is non-GMO or straight Roundup Ready or Liberty Link, remember that there will be a preplant interval for 2,4-D or dicamba.  The interval for 2,4-D will be shorter for these soybean traits.  So, a mixture of 2,4-D + saflufenacil or metribuzin for broadleaf weeds will be the backbone of the burndown program and all that is likely needed for burndown if no grass weeds are present.  As mentioned above, we will want to build the weed control program around a broadspectrum residual herbicide, so simply adding 2,4-D to premixes that contain saflufenacil (Verdict, Zidua Pro) or metribuzin (Authority MTZ, Canopy Blend, Intimidator, Kyber, Matador, Boundary/Moccasin MTZ, Trivence, or Panther Pro) makes the most sense and would require a 7 to 30 day preplant interval depending on the 2,4-D formulation and rate used.  If you planted Enlist beans, you would use the same strategy, but no preplant interval is required if you use the 2,4-D choline (Enlist One) product from Corteva.  If you plant Xtend soybeans, simply replace 2,4-D with an approved dicamba product (Engenia, Xtendimax, or Tavium) and no preplant interval is required for that trait. The postemergence weed control program will be based on the soybean trait planted and the weeds that break through the residual herbicide.  Adding a group #15 residual herbicide to the postemergence application will be the backbone of your small seeded broadleaf and grass control program and reduce the need for a second postemergence application later in the growing season.

Next week, we will cover recommendations for Examples 5 and 6 outlined below.

Example 5. A field is planted to multi specie mixture of cover crops that contains cereal rye, (and to a lesser extent annual rye) and other species which include legumes and brassicas.  The cover crops that will need to be terminated prior to corn.

Example 6. A field is planted to multi specie mixture of cover crops such as cereal rye, (and to a lesser extent annual rye) and other species which include legumes and brassicas. The cover crops that will need to be terminated prior to soybeans.

These are just a few examples of some different scenarios to consider when building a weed control program.  Keep in mind that the concern isn’t just the limited supply of glyphosate and glufosinate, but the increase in cost, especially glyphosate which may be 4X the cost just a few years ago, which makes other herbicide options much more feasible that you didn’t consider previously.  We will add other examples to this discussion as we write our future newsletter articles through the winter months.  We will also be covering this topic in our winter county meetings as well.

Other Tips:

  • Target using “regular” rates of glyphosate to stretch supply. Instead of using 32 or 44 oz/acre of a Roundup brand product, consider using the standard rate on the label such as 22 oz/acre for Roundup PowerMax (Note – Roundup PowerMax3 will be launched in 2022 and the standard rate is 20 oz/acre; equivalent to 22 oz/acre of the old R. PowerMax formulation).
  • Identify glyphosate or glufosinate premixes that may be in greater supply or at lower relative costs compared to solo glyphosate and glufosinate products.
  • Failure is not an option for herbicide applications. Make sure you optimize your herbicide applications using the best methods (GPA, spray nozzles, etc.), adjuvants, and minimal weed size for foliar applications.
  • Substitute alternative corn post herbicides that control grasses and broadleaves, if they don’t include a residual group 15 herbicide, add one to the postemergence mixture.
  • Cultivate if needed and/or possible.
  • Hand weed escapes prior to the weeds setting seed.

T-L Irrigation Co. Introduces Pro Version Of Precision Point Touch Pivot Controller

T-L Irrigation Co. introduces Precision Point Touch Pro, an add-on board combined with a firmware upgrade that dials up simplicity, options and functionality for pivot system controls while decluttering the irrigation workspace.

The Pro board, which can be retrofitted to an existing Touch system or added as an option to a new pivot, combines into one simplified package:

• Water pump control
• Water-pressure triggered start
• Two additional auxiliary equipment controls
• Water pressure monitoring
• Detailed safety readouts for easy troubleshooting
• USB datalogging of multiple system parameters
• Load control
• Telemetry connect-ability

“Precision Point Touch Pro gathers functions once requiring several different systems and external hardware together into one simple, efficient full color touch-screen controller. Plus, the two auxiliary relays allow for greater flexibility and more precise management of the irrigation system as a whole,” says John Thom, T-L Irrigation Co. Vice President.

Besides eliminating the complication and expense of external hardware systems, Precision Point Touch Pro adds capabilities such as water pressure monitoring and management.

“You get a direct readout of water pressure on the panel,” says Neal Schlautman, T-L Irrigation Co. engineering manager. “You can also set a specific psi for the system to build to before the pivot kicks on, assuring the system is irrigating when it starts moving.

Safety inputs deliver specific readouts for troubleshooting. “It’s not just a ‘check-engine’ light, it’s a diagnosis of where the problem is,” Thom says.

Additional auxiliary relays that allow for specific degree inputs for turn on and shutoff makes it easy to dial in precise pivot management.

“A chemigation pump can be controlled to be on for corn and turn off when the pivot reaches the preprogramed spot where a split field switches to soybeans,” Thom says. The original Precision Point Touch has two end gun controls. With the Pro system, a producer can easily tie into the extra relays to control individual spans or an entire half of a pivot.

“The Pro panel upgrade just makes the whole irrigation process work seamlessly together,” Thom says.

About T-L Irrigation Co.
T-L Irrigation Co. is a family-owned irrigation solutions business based in Hastings, Neb. For 67 years they’ve been committed to providing reliable and high-quality center pivots, irrigation systems, agriculture and irrigation equipment, and innovative water management products that are intuitive for farmers to use and repair. They distribute throughout the United States and to 80 countries. For more information visit www.tlirr.com.

ADAMA’s Max-Ace Herbicide Tolerance Technology For Rice Approved By Canadian Health Agency

The Max-Ace Cropping Solution with Highcard released by RiceTec and ADAMA has officially received approval by the Canadian Health Agency’s Feed and Food Divisions for commercial use. This authorization now allows for unrestricted planting of and harvesting of Max-Ace rice products.

This herbicide tolerant technology with Highcard herbicide gives rice growers an excellent tool for weed control, high-yield, a rice rotation alternative to the FullPage Rice Cropping Solution and conventional offerings from RiceTec. Max-Ace with Highcard is now available for the 2022 growing season with two primary Max-Ace products being released: RTv7231 MA and RT7331 MA.

“Demo fields of Max-Ace in the 2021 season showed high potential for yield,” said Mason Wallace , RiceTec Technical Service Manager. “With yield advantages ranging from 31% to 49%, growers have been pleased with the performance of Max-Ace with Highcard as a profitable crop and technology rotational tool.”

The Max-Ace technology takes advantage of a unique, non-GMO trait that gives the rice enhanced tolerance to the Highcard herbicide. Highcard features a proprietary safener which grants enhanced tolerance to Max-Ace rice while providing excellent postemergence control of a broad spectrum of difficult to control grass weeds including red and weedy rice and IMI-resistant weeds.

“Herbicide performance in this year’s field plots has demonstrated that Highcard provided crop safety and effective weed control in Max-Acre rice,” said Dave Feist, ADAMA US Product Strategy Leader. “We are excited to be bringing this new proprietary safened herbicide to market alongside RiceTec.”

To meet stewardship requirements and maximize the effectiveness and longevity of this technology for rice growers, Highcard needs to be applied sequentially both early (2-leaf or later) and before panicle initiation.

To learn more about Max-Ace Rice Cropping Solution with Highcard herbicide, talk to your local RiceTec sales representative or visit www.ricetec.com.

Ag Tech Developer Skyward Apps Expands Its Developers’ Training On Software Security Risks

Skyward Apps, a top-tier agriculture technology firm, has put its software engineers through training on the Top 10 software security vulnerabilities, as defined by the global Open Web Application Security Project.

Skyward’s additional training comes amidst a sharp uptick in ransomware attacks on the agriculture food supply chain, which has disrupted farm operations, equipment, food processing, and distribution.

“We have always had multiple sets of eyes review every piece of software we develop, but the protection of our clients’ interests-as well as our own-is paramount,” said CEO Kat Crawford. “Agriculture is now a high-tech business, which brings with it both benefits and risks.”

Agriculture is regarded as highly vulnerable to cyber threats due to the complexity of integrating data from farm equipment, sensors, GPS and automation systems, including legacy systems without updated security controls. Another issue is the overall lack of security awareness throughout the sector.

“The theme of Cybersecurity Awareness Month is ‘Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart’, which is what we strive to do year-round,” said Skyward CTO Nick Elliott. “We systematically check for errors and vulnerabilities as part of our code reviews, automated and manual testing processes.”

The 2021 list of most critical software security risks include three new categories:
• Insecure Design – the result of software design flaws
• Software and Data Integrity Failures – the result of inadequate security controls
• Server-side request forgery – the result of a security bug that allows malicious server requests without validation

The full OWASP Top 10 checklist can be found here.

Winners For The 2021 National Wheat Foundation’s Yield Contest Announced

he National Wheat Foundation’s (NWF) National Wheat Yield Contest (NWYC) offers growers the opportunity to compete with farmers from across the United States and improve their production practices through new and innovative techniques. Today, NWF is happy to announce the national winners for the 2021 National Wheat Yield Contest. See who won and read more about their entries here!

“Better than expected” is how many of the grower participants describe their 2021 wheat crops. The crops in the spring wheat areas overcame historic drought and a heatwave that is being described as a 1000-year weather event. The winter wheat crop experienced the “Valentine’s Week Historic Winter Outbreak” of snow, sleet, freezing rain and extremely cold temperatures that lasted for several days. In the Northeast, the rain was plentiful and too much so during harvest time. Despite these challenges, 387 wheat growers still entered the contest and 150 of them took their entries to yield in order to compete and see how they fared versus other growers in the country.

Wheat growers are resilient and hopeful by nature. The challenge of growing better wheat than they did the year before motivates them to try new management practices, varieties, and techniques. We know the winners appreciate the prize of being recognized, but more importantly, learn and improve their wheat yields and quality every season.

“NWF would like to thank each grower for enrolling in the NWYC and thank our sponsors for helping to make the Contest available to wheat growers in the United States. Entries for the Contest were 387 this year, spring wheat entries were down a little, due to the drought,” stated National Wheat Foundation Board Chairman, David Cleavinger. “Yields and quality were excellent in this year’s entries and contestants tell us they are continuing to learn how to increase their yields and quality on their farms.”

The contest recognizes winners in two primary competition categories: winter wheat and spring wheat, and two subcategories: dryland and irrigated. Grain must be Grade 1 or 2 by Federal Grain Inspection Service (FGIS) standards to be eligible for awards. National winners will receive a trip to the Commodity Classic in New Orleans, LA in March 2022 and be recognized at an awards reception.

The sponsors for the 2021 National Yield Contest are AgriMaxx, Ardent Mills, BASF, Croplan/Winfield, Elevate Ag, Grain Craft, GrainSense, John Deere, Miller Milling, Michigan Wheat, Nutrien, Ohio Corn and Wheat, and WestBred.

Winter Wheat – Dryland
William Willard MD Bin Buster
Jeffery Krohn MI 1st
Brian Kreider PA 2nd
Douglas Goyings OH 3rd
Michael Ebelhar KY 4th
Tyler Ediger KS 5th

Winter Wheat – Dryland % Increase
Travis Freeburg NE 1st
Shawn Kimbrell TX 2nd
Zach Balahtsis OK 3rd
Kenneth O’Neal TX 4th
Matt Jaeger KS 5th

Spring Wheat – Dryland
John Hofer ND Bin Buster
Dallas Diesen MN 1st
Robert Holzwarth SD 2nd
Bruce Anderson ND 3rd

Spring Wheat – Dryland % Increase
Greg Messer ND 1st
Chris Carlson ND 2nd
Jordan Christman ND 3rd

Winter Wheat – Irrigated
Steven VanGrunsven OR Bin Buster
Rylee Reynolds ID 1st
Joel Zwainz WA 2nd

Spring Wheat – Irrigated
Phillip Gross WA Bin Buster
Boe Clausen WA 1st
Dallin Wilcox ID 2nd

*It should be noted winners are selected by the percentage increase their yield exceeds the most recent 5-year Olympic County average as determined by USDA.

For more details on the winning entries and to review the official rules and entry details for the 2022 contest, visit yieldcontest.wheatfoundation.org.

National Corn Growers Assn, 50 Other Ag Groups, Comment On Disruptive Factors Facing U.S. Supply Chain

The National Corn Growers Association joined 51 other agricultural groups in submitting comments this week to the U.S. Department of Transportation addressing the many disruptive factors facing the U.S. supply chain. The comments provide recommendations on how to alleviate these challenges through legislative and regulatory actions.

“To be successful, farmers must have a reliable and fully functioning national transportation system that will allow us to receive our fall fertilizer shipments and deliver our products to consumers in a timely fashion,” said NCGA President Chris Edgington. “That’s why NCGA, along with other groups, are making our voices heard in these discussions.”

The comments address several key areas of concern to corn growers, including:

• Inland Waterways. The inland waterways system is vital to the American supply chain and gives U.S. producers a significant advantage in terms of cost and efficiency over international competitors. The comments urge the administration to prioritize legislative and regulatory actions that promote the rehabilitation of aging waterway infrastructure on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois River. This includes the addition of seven 1,200-foot locks on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway as part of the Navigation Ecosystem Sustainability Program.

• Rail Competition and Service. The comments mention the value of promoting competition in rail transportation and the cost saving outcomes such actions would have on U.S. grain shippers and receivers. The comments encourage the Surface Transportation Board to consider a regulation which would allow for the use of “reciprocal” or “competitive switching.” Competitive switching would enable shippers and receivers geographically beholden to one rail carrier to gain access to a second rail carrier through a short distance “switch.” NCGA supports a competitive and nondiscriminatory rate structure for our nation’s railroads.

• Motor Carrier Freight Transportation Efficiency. The comments recommend a few key actions that could help alleviate the disruption in the U.S. motor carrier freight transportation sector. One of our recommendations, for example, was that USDA and the U.S. Department of Transportation continue to coordinate to ensure agricultural haulers and the rest of the trucking industry have the flexibilities needed to provide timely delivery of essential products. Flexibilities such as relief from Hours-of-Service requirements have been critical over the last 18 months.

NCGA’s actions come on the heels of President Biden’s announcement that the Port of Los Angeles would begin to operate 24 hours, seven days a week. This move could potentially mitigate the bottleneck of goods on the west coast awaiting distribution throughout the country.

Study Reports 80% Of Midwest Farmers In Solid Cash Position

For nearly a year, the rural economy has shown consistent growth, according to the Creighton University Rural Mainstreet Index (RMI).

For October 2021, the RMI rose to 66.1, which is up from September’s 62.5. The index ranges between 0 and 100 with a reading of 50 representing growth neutral.

“Solid grain prices, the Federal Reserve’s record-low interest rates, and growing exports have underpinned the Rural Mainstreet Economy,” says Ernie Goss, who chairs Creighton’s Heider College of Business and leads the RMI. “USDA data show 2021 year-to-date agriculture exports are more than 25% above that for the same period in 2020. This has been an important factor supporting the Rural Mainstreet economy.”

 

 

Around eight of 10 bankers report farmers in their areas were in solid cash position with little need for borrowing. The remaining 18% of bankers reported farmer cash positions little changed from past years.

The October loan volume index fell to 53.6 from September’s 58.9.

However, Steve Simon, CEO of South Story Bank in Slater-Huxley, Iowa, shared, “Year-end borrowing as farmers look to pre-pay rising input costs.”

 

 

Farmland prices condition to accelerate. The region’s farmland price index slid to a very strong 81.5 from September’s record 85.2. October’s reading represented the 14th straight month that the index has moved above growth neutral.

The October farm equipment-sales index slipped to a strong 64.8 from 66 in September. Readings over the last several months represent the strongest consistent growth since 2012.

Bank CEOs indicated that congestion at domestic transportation hubs represented the greatest supply chain disruption for farmers. Other key challenges include bottlenecks at processors and delays for purchasing inputs and equipment.

 

 

The confidence index, which reflects bank CEO expectations for the economy six months out sank for the fourth straight month to 51.8, its lowest level since November of last year, and down from September’s much stronger 65.4.

The RMI, which started in 2005, represents an early snapshot of the economy of rural agricultural and energy-dependent portions of the nation. It focuses on 200 rural communities with an average population of 1,300.

USDA To Make Up To $1.15 Billion Available To Help People Living In Rural Communities Access High-Speed Internet

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced a significant expansion of access to high-speed internet, health care and educational services for millions of rural Americans nationwide. Today’s announcement continues to move forward President Biden’s Build Back Better Agenda by prioritizing economic growth in rural America and investing in the backbone of our country – the middle class.

“For too long, the ‘digital divide’ has left too many people living in rural communities behind: unable to compete in the global economy and unable to access the services and resources that all Americans need,” Vilsack said. “As we build back better than we were before, the actions I am announcing today will go a long way toward ensuring that people who live or work in rural areas are able to tap into the benefits of broadband, including access to specialized health care, educational opportunities and the global marketplace. Rural people, businesses and communities must have affordable, reliable, high-speed internet so they can fully participate in modern society and the modern economy.”

Background: ReConnect Program
Secretary Vilsack spoke about USDA’s commitment to helping rural Americans get improved access to broadband and health care during a visit to the newly renovated emergency department at Hammond Henry Hospital. The project was financed in part by a USDA loan.

He announced that on November 24 USDA will begin accepting applications for up to $1.15 billion in loans and grants to expand the availability of broadband in rural areas. USDA is making the funding available through the ReConnect Program.

To be eligible for ReConnect Program funding, an applicant must serve an area without broadband service at speeds of 100 megabits per second (Mbps) (download) and 20 Mbps (upload), and commit to building facilities capable of providing broadband service at speeds of 100 Mbps (download and upload) to every location in its proposed service area. In making funding decisions, USDA will prioritize projects that will serve low-density rural areas with locations lacking internet access services at speeds of at least 25 Mbps (download) and 3 Mbps (upload).

In making funding decisions, the USDA will also consider, among other things, the economic needs of the community to be served; the extent which a provider will offer affordable service options; a project’s commitment to strong labor standards; and whether a project is serving tribal lands or is submitted by a local government, Tribal Government, non-profit or cooperative.

USDA has simplified the application process and has expanded the program significantly. For example, ReConnect will now offer 100 percent grants for certain projects on tribal lands and in socially vulnerable communities.

The Department plans to make available up to $200 million in ReConnect Program loans, up to $250 million in loan/grant combinations, up to $350 million in grants with a 25 percent matching requirement, and up to $350 million in grants with no matching requirement for projects in tribal and socially vulnerable communities.

Background: Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grants
Vilsack also announced today a $50 million investment in 105 rural distance learning and telemedicine (PDF, 224 KB) projects in 37 states and Puerto Rico. These awards are being funded through USDA’s Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) program. This program helps fund distance learning and telemedicine services in rural areas to increase access to education, training and health care resources that are otherwise limited or unavailable.

USDA’s distance learning and telemedicine investment includes a $387,000 grant to OSF Healthcare System to help establish a telehealth network for 107,000 rural residents in central Illinois. Additionally, UHS of Texoma, Inc. is receiving a $199,015 grant to implement a distance learning system to improve mental health services for 8,000 people in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nation in Oklahoma.

For additional information on the upcoming ReConnect Program funding opportunity, see the Oct. 22, 2021, Federal Register (PDF, 319 KB). Once the application window opens, applications must be submitted through USDA Rural Development’s online application system on the ReConnect webpage. All required materials for completing an application are included in the online system.

To learn more about ReConnect Program eligibility, technical assistance and recent announcements, visit www.usda.gov/reconnect.

Under the Biden-Harris Administration, Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities, create jobs and improve the quality of life for millions of Americans in rural areas.

This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural, Tribal and high-poverty areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov. If you’d like to subscribe to USDA Rural Development updates, visit our GovDelivery subscriber page.

COVID-19 and demand for e-commerce

COVID-19 has accelerated the uptake of online food shopping.

‘Consumer behaviour and attitudes towards food purchasing changed quickly and dramatically because of the pandemic,’ says Jeewani Fernando, provincial consumer market analyst with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. ‘Despite the large volume of sales during the pandemic, there was a marked decline in multiple weekly grocery trips. These have been replaced by single large shopping trips and an increase in online purchasing.’

The latest Consumer Corner looks at how COVID-19 affected the demand for e-commerce. Fernando says many consumers tried online food shopping for the first time during the pandemic. Sales trends show that consumers have become more comfortable buying grocery and food products online.

Convenience is the main reason for online shopping followed by safety and health and other factors. However, consumer concerns about fees, the quality and selection of perishable items, and an immediate need for the groceries are some of the main challenges.

‘Retailers may consider expanding same-day delivery service or introducing annual subscription plans rather than using one-time delivery fees. They might also increase the availability of curbside pickup to alleviate some of the concerns and to drive more online shopping.’

Pandemic restrictions on restaurant capacity and reluctance among many diners to frequent indoor public places have shifted food service and drinking places to offer more contactless delivery and take-out options, and many have made investments to expand their online sales capabilities. Consumers stayed home and used various platforms to find restaurants and order in meals in 2020.

‘Using e-commerce to purchase food still has strong growth potential in Canada, given the significant growth in both supply and demand during the pandemic in 2020. These industry insights may help Alberta food retailers and food service providers to better manage their food product offerings in the post-pandemic era,’ says Fernando.

Read the latest Consumer Corner on COVID-19 and the demand for e-commerce.

Federal Reserve: Observations on the Ag Economy- October 2021

On Wednesday, the Federal Reserve Board released its October 2021 Beige Book update, a summary of commentary on current economic conditions by Federal Reserve District. The report included several observations pertaining to the U.S. agricultural economy.

Graph of Fed Districts from, “The Beige Book.”

* Sixth District- Atlanta– “Agricultural conditions remained mixed. Widespread rain kept the District free of drought, but left parts of the District in abnormally moist to excessively wet conditions.

Producers continued to assess damages from Hurricane Ida; initial estimates indicated damage to row and vegetable crops, sugarcane, timber, livestock, and infrastructure.

“On a year-over-year basis, production forecasts for corn, soybean, peanut, and cotton crops were up while rice and sugarcane forecasts were down. The USDA reported year-over-year prices paid to farmers in August were up for corn, cotton, soybeans, cattle, broilers, and eggs, but down for rice and milk. On a month-over-month basis, prices were up for corn, rice, cattle, broilers, and eggs but down for cotton, soybeans, and milk.”

* Seventh District- Chicago– “In spite of drought in some areas, corn and soybean harvests in the District were larger than expected and near record levels. More plentiful supplies of both crops were putting downward pressure on prices. That said, corn and soybean prices were higher than a year ago. Cattle prices were flat, while milk prices recovered some. Facing higher feed costs, dairy farm margins tightened.

Rising energy prices and logistical problems were creating concerns about the cost and availability for 2022.

Farmland prices and rents continued to grow.

“Cash from government programs and product sales were holding back demand for agricultural lending.”

Eighth District- St. Louis– Agriculture conditions have slightly improved since our previous report. Overall crop yields have increased moderately over the previous year. Contacts are very optimistic about the current conditions in the District. Farmers have reported a strong harvest season combined with high prices, which have contributed to a strong season overall. Hurricane Ida caused some slight delays but was not a major disruption to the District’s agribusiness. There is, however, some concern about rising input prices, global supply chain disruptions, and the lack of labor necessary for both low- and high-skilled agriculture work.”

* Ninth District- Minneapolis– “District agricultural conditions deteriorated somewhat since the previous report. While producers continued to benefit from solid commodity prices, most of the District remained in severe or worse drought condition. Yields and production of wheat and other small grain crops in District states for 2021 will be sharply lower than the previous year.

Agricultural Statistics Board Briefing. Small Grains and Stocks, USDA- National Agricultural Statistics Service (September 2021).

“Most of the District’s corn and soybean crops were rated in fair or poor condition.”

* Tenth District- Kansas City– “Conditions in the Tenth District agricultural sector remained strong.  Prices of corn, soybeans and hogs decreased slightly since August, but, along with wheat and cotton prices, remained at multi-year highs.  Contacts reported ongoing concerns about rising inputs costs putting downward pressure on farm incomes in coming months.

“Some contacts also noted a desire to hold larger inventories of inputs over the coming year.  Weakness in the cattle industry persisted as concerns about drought and higher input costs intensified.  Low cattle prices continued to limit profit margins for ranchers.”

* Eleventh District- Dallas– “Soil conditions remained mostly adequate in Texas, though drought conditions persisted in parts of southern New Mexico. Crop conditions were quite favorable, boosting expectations for substantially higher production this year than last across a variety of crops, including cotton, sorghum, and corn. Agricultural prices generally softened slightly over the reporting period. Pasture conditions were fair to good, and promising soil moisture conditions for the planting of winter wheat increased optimism for crop performance.”

Twelfth District- San Francisco– “Conditions in the agriculture and resource sectors strengthened somewhat. Demand for the regions’ agricultural products continued to be robust both domestically and internationally. Crop yields on tree fruit, wheat, and grapes were lower due to warmer temperatures and water shortages. A few contacts reported farmers leaving a portion of their acreage fallow to use water on more profitable crops. As a result, some fruit inventories were reduced. Several contacts noted price pressures coming from increased transportation and labor costs. Some producers in the Pacific Northwest highlighted that labor shortages led them to hire most of their seasonal workers through the temporary workers visa program as opposed to locally. Supply chain disruptions and shipping delays continued to weigh on producers with one contact reporting about 25 percent of orders being unshipped.”

Source: Farm Policy News

Herbicide Shortage – How To Plan For The 2022 Growing Season

There is a lot of speculation about a herbicide shortage for the 2022 growing season, which will impact weed management decisions starting with fall applications.  The two main active ingredients that we’re hearing about right now are glyphosate (Roundup, others) and glufosinate (Liberty, others), both associated with an increase in cost.  There will likely be limited supplies of other pesticide active ingredients as well, but in the short term, a shortage of these two active ingredients poses some major challenges for corn and soybean production.  The purpose of this article is to discuss ways to minimize the impact of herbicide shortage on corn and soybean production in the Midwest.  As you search for alternatives to these two herbicides you may have already determined that weed control guides produced by University Extension and Industry will become your most important tool for planning your herbicide purchases for many years to come.  To access the Weed Control Guide for Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, follow this link – https://extensionpubs.osu.edu/2021-weed-control-guide-for-ohio-indiana-and-illinois/.

First, what is causing the shortage?  There are several different factors which are impacting this issue. In no particular order, the reasons for the herbicide shortage include a decline in number of laborers to unload tanker ships at gulf ports, lack of truck transportation from the ports to get the ingredients to U.S. formulation plants or formulated products to the retailers, reduced supplies of some of the inert ingredients of the formulation, shortages of materials to make containers and packaging, and Hurricane Ida that damaged a glyphosate production plant in Luling, LA (https://www.agweb.com/news/business/technology/hurricane-ida-idles-largest-glyphosate-production-plant-us).

Regardless of the cause, it is also important to consider herbicide costs. We are hearing that glyphosate prices will be in excess of $80/gallon.  So, even if there is not a shortage, you should plan your weed control strategies for the next growing season to accommodate a limited availability because of supply or price of these two active ingredients.

It is important to point out that the demand for glyphosate will be considerably less in a conventional till system then in a no-till system.  Glyphosate is arguably the most important herbicide that facilitates no-till crop production.  It’s even more important in systems where cover crops are used and need to be terminated before corn or soybean planting.  Therefore, one simple way to reduce reliance on glyphosate is to simply go back to using tillage for fall and early spring weed control.  This practice will be very effective for controlling the weeds emerged at the time of tillage, but some farm operations may not be set up for the extra equipment, labor, and fuel needed to do this on a widespread basis.  In addition, replacing burndown herbicides with tillage threatens soil conservation practices.  Glufosinate demand, on the other hand, will not be impacted as much by choice of tillage system since we don’t use glufosinate in our fall or spring burndown application, and not much is used in corn.  There is some glufosinate used in delayed burndown situations.  However, we mostly use glufosinate postemergence in soybeans after the crop and summer annual weeds have emerged.

If you’re not interested in returning to widespread use of tillage, keep in mind that you are looking for ways to control winter annual weeds before planting and control grass weeds with other herbicides to decrease reliance on glyphosate for postemergence grass weed control.  Secondly, regardless of tillage system, you want to build a solid residual program as the backbone of your weed control strategy to reduce reliance on using glyphosate postemergence in the crops.  In the next section of this article, we will outline some weed control considerations based on the type of tillage system you are in and the weeds to be controlled at different times of the year.

Figure 1. Sprayer (Photo Credit: Fred Whitford)

Figure 1. Herbicide mixtures and application parameters will become even more important when dealing with shortages of our most popular herbicides. (Photo Credit: Fred Whitford)

Fall Applied Herbicides for Winter Annuals on No-Till Ground

If you are a cover crop user, plant high biomass producing covers that include cereal rye for horseweed suppression.  Suppression of winter annuals other than horseweed can be somewhat variable, but we usually have better results if biomass production is high in the fall.  If legumes are not planted with the cereal rye, we can also use 2,4-D or dicamba in the fall to control winter annual broadleaf weeds that emerge before winter freeze up.  Weed control benefits from high biomass cover crops can also be realized for the 2022 growing season as well.  We occasionally see some suppression of waterhemp and annual grasses as well with high biomass cover crops.

If you are not a cover crop user and you use fall applied herbicides for winter annuals, consider taking out glyphosate and just using 2,4-D + dicamba mixtures this fall IF you only have broadleaf weeds [chickweed, henbit/deadnettle, shepherd’s purse, field pennycress, mustard species, cressleaf groundsel, dandelion (which is a perennial), poison hemlock (a biennial), etc.] in your fields.  If you have grass weeds (annual bluegrass, Carolina foxtail, false timothy, others), and they are small and actively growing, you can use reduced rates of glyphosate to control the grasses and rely on 2,4-D + dicamba mixtures to control the broadleaf weeds.  Keep in mind that if you mix reduced rates of glyphosate with 2,4-D, dicamba or both, grass control can be compromised (herbicide antagonism).  So, make those applications on a warm day and be sure to add AMS to the mix to minimize the risk of herbicide antagonism.  In addition, we have observed that the addition of saflufenacil (Sharpen, others), can help speed the activity of glyphosate on some annual grass species.  Again, if you are reducing the rate of glyphosate to conserve your supply, adding a saflufenacil product might improve the activity of glyphosate.  Remember to use MSO and a nitrogen source with saflufenacil for optimum foliar activity.

There are other active ingredients that provide some control or suppression of winter annual grass weeds and can be used in the fall, such as paraquat, clethodim (Select, others) and rimsulfuron (Resolve, Basis, Crusher, others).  These herbicides will be a bit more limited in the spectrum of weeds controlled compared to glyphosate.  Therefore, make sure to properly identify the weeds present in the field and check if the weed species found are listed on labels of these products.  Paraquat is commonly used with metribuzin (Sencor, TriCor, others) and 2,4-D or dicamba for fields going to soybean.  For fields going to corn paraquat + simazine (Princep, others) + 2,4-D or dicamba would be an effective broadspectrum treatment.  If you are using a clethodim or rimsulfuron product instead of paraquat, add 2,4-D or dicamba to help with broadleaf weeds.

Spring Applied Herbicides for Winter Annuals and Early Emerging Summer Annuals on No-Till Ground

For no-till corn acres, we have to design a program to 1) control the winter annual and early spring summer annual weeds that have emerged, 2) fit the crop being grown that summer, and 3) factor in the fairly long list of residual premixes that might have some combination of atrazine, isoxaflutole, mesotrione, rimsulfuron or thiencarbazone, metribuzin, or saflufenacil in them.  All these herbicides have some foliar activity on early spring weeds and fit into a no-till burndown scenario.  Isoxaflutole, rimsulfuron, and thiencarbazone have foliar and residual activity on grasses and will control a few selected broadleaf weeds.  Metribuzin, saflufenacil, and mesotrione have foliar and residual activity on a key no-till weed, horseweed (aka marestail), and can also help with waterhemp and Palmer amaranth control.  A group 15 herbicide (metolachlor, dimethenamid, pyroxasulfone, acetochlor) is also needed to form the backbone of the soil residual grass and small seeded broadleaf weed control program for the season.

As we get closer to the 2022 growing season and start planning for control of summer annual weeds it will be important to assess your supply of these active ingredients and build the backbone of your weed control program around full rates of residual herbicides so you can minimize reliance on postemergence herbicides.  As mentioned in the introduction, there are many good references available to help you determine which residual herbicides best fit the weed species you are battling.  Consult the weed response table such as these to choose the best product for each specific field.  If you can build a weed control program that only requires one postemergence treatment of glyphosate or glufosinate, and possibly at a rate less than the maximum labeled rate, that will allow you to stretch glyphosate and glufosinate supplies over more acres.  However, don’t fall into the trap of thinking you only get one application of these herbicides so you should wait for the last weed flush before you spray.  With limited supply and increased costs, the best route is to use a reasonable rate on small weeds with the best adjuvant system and application method possible.  Use residual herbicides to manage other weed flushes.

Here are a few scenarios to consider based on the problematic weeds in a specific field.  Keep in mind we do not endorse any specific product or company.  We are simply pointing out which products, based on the active ingredients they contain, would be a good fit with the weed pressure we have mentioned.  All the University Extension weed control guides and most of the guides written by the crop protection industry have weed efficacy tables in them to help the user determine which products provide acceptable control of the most common weeds in the specific geographical area covered by the guide.  Of course, these guides assume all herbicide label recommendations are followed for the application and herbicide resistance in the weed population has been considered.

Example 1.  A no-till corn field with lots of annual bluegrass or Carolina foxtail, and summer annual grass pressure.  If the grasses are 3 inches or less in height, and you have a limited supply of glyphosate, consider using this combination for your burndown treatment – Corvus or Revulin Q at a full labeled rate.  The thiencarbazone + isoxaflutole in Corvus or the rimsulfuron + mesotrione in Revulin Q will control small annual grasses.  Add atrazine (1 to 1.5 lb ai/A) and possibly a group 15 herbicide to boost residual broadleaf and grass weed control.  If you have some emerged broadleaf weeds present when the burndown treatment is made, add saflufenacil, 2,4-D or dicamba to the mixture.  For weeds that break through the residual treatment, use a postemergence treatment of glufosinate + dicamba or glyphosate + dicamba and add a 1/3 to ½ label rate of the atrazine premix products that contains a group 15 herbicide to lengthen the window of residual weed control in the crop.  We know many growers won’t use glufosinate in corn since it isn’t always clear what hybrids are Liberty Link and they want to save the glufosinate for soybeans.  You can also use Revulin Q, Realm Q, Armezon, Armezon PRO, Impact or Laudis for postemergence grass control if glyphosate or glufosinate is not available.

Example 2.  What if the field in example 1 will be planted to soybean, rather than corn and is also infested with horseweed and waterhemp?  The good news here is that there are several premixes available that have metribuzin in them.  We have always observed better activity out of paraquat by adding a triazine herbicide to it and by simply adding paraquat and 2,4-D to a premix that has metribuzin in it, you have a ready-made, broadspectrum burndown and residual herbicide.  The soybean premixed products that would fit this scenario include Authority MTZ, Canopy, Dimetric Charged, Intimidator, Matador, Boundary/Moccasin MTZ.  The second choice would be to use clethodim for grasses + other herbicides to control broadleaf weeds.  Clethodim can be used for emerged grasses, but activity will be slower in cool weather conditions and can also be antagonized by other components of the mixture (2,4-D, dicamba, acetochlor).  Rimsulfuron can be used 30 days or more before planting soybean and may help with winter annual grasses, providing some residual control of summer annual grasses as well. Use of rimsulfuron would be best suited to STS or Bolt soybeans since they will be more tolerant to rimsulfuron.  The postemergence weed control program will be based on the soybean trait planted and the weeds that break through the residual herbicide.  Adding a group #15 residual herbicide (metolachlor, dimethenamid, pyroxasulfone, acetochlor) to the postemergence application will be the backbone of your small seeded broadleaf and grass control program, and reduce the need for a second postemergence application later in the growing season.

Example 3.  A no-till corn field with no winter annual grasses, but lots of horseweed (marestail), giant ragweed, and lambsquarters have started to emerge.  The field has a history of having some foxtail, fall panicum and waterhemp, but the summer annual grasses and waterhemp don’t emerge as early as the ragweed and lambsquarters.  Use Acuron, Lumax/Lexar, Resicore, or Verdict.  Add saflufenacil (not needed with Verdict since it contains saflufenacil), 2,4-D or dicamba to each of them for additional foliar activity on broadleaf weeds.  Add atrazine to Resicore or Verdict for additional residual control of broadleaf weeds. If summer annual grass weeds have emerged, add paraquat or a pint/A of glyphosate to the mixture.  If saflufenacil is added to one of the premixes that doesn’t contain saflufenacil, add 20-30 gallons of UAN (if corn has not emerged) and MSO for burndown of small grasses and broadleaves. For weeds that break through the residual treatment, use glufosinate + dicamba or glyphosate + dicamba and add a 1/3 to ½ label rate of the atrazine premix product that contains a group 15 herbicide to lengthen the window of residual weed control in the crop. You can also use Revulin Q, Realm Q, Armezon, Armezon PRO, Impact or Laudis for postemergence grass control if glyphosate or glufosinate is not available.

Example 4.  What if the field in Example 3 will be planted to soybean, rather than corn?  In this field, broadleaf weeds (winter and summer annuals) and horseweed are the target with the burndown treatment.  So, start of by determining which soybean trait will be planted.  If it is non-GMO or straight Roundup Ready or Liberty Link, remember that there will be a preplant interval for 2,4-D or dicamba.  The interval for 2,4-D will be shorter for these soybean traits.  So, a mixture of 2,4-D + saflufenacil or metribuzin for broadleaf weeds will be the backbone of the burndown program and all that is likely needed for burndown if no grass weeds are present.  As mentioned above, we will want to build the weed control program around a broadspectrum residual herbicide, so simply adding 2,4-D to premixes that contain saflufenacil (Verdict, Zidua Pro) or metribuzin (Authority MTZ, Canopy Blend, Intimidator, Kyber, Matador, Boundary/Moccasin MTZ, Trivence, or Panther Pro) makes the most sense and would require a 7 to 30 day preplant interval depending on the 2,4-D formulation and rate used.  If you planted Enlist beans, you would use the same strategy, but no preplant interval is required if you use the 2,4-D choline (Enlist One) product from Corteva.  If you plant Xtend soybeans, simply replace 2,4-D with an approved dicamba product (Engenia, Xtendimax, or Tavium) and no preplant interval is required for that trait. The postemergence weed control program will be based on the soybean trait planted and the weeds that break through the residual herbicide.  Adding a group #15 residual herbicide to the postemergence application will be the backbone of your small seeded broadleaf and grass control program and reduce the need for a second postemergence application later in the growing season.

Next week, we will cover recommendations for Examples 5 and 6 outlined below.

Example 5. A field is planted to multi specie mixture of cover crops that contains cereal rye, (and to a lesser extent annual rye) and other species which include legumes and brassicas.  The cover crops that will need to be terminated prior to corn.

Example 6. A field is planted to multi specie mixture of cover crops such as cereal rye, (and to a lesser extent annual rye) and other species which include legumes and brassicas. The cover crops that will need to be terminated prior to soybeans.

These are just a few examples of some different scenarios to consider when building a weed control program.  Keep in mind that the concern isn’t just the limited supply of glyphosate and glufosinate, but the increase in cost, especially glyphosate which may be 4X the cost just a few years ago, which makes other herbicide options much more feasible that you didn’t consider previously.  We will add other examples to this discussion as we write our future newsletter articles through the winter months.  We will also be covering this topic in our winter county meetings as well.

Other Tips:

  • Target using “regular” rates of glyphosate to stretch supply. Instead of using 32 or 44 oz/acre of a Roundup brand product, consider using the standard rate on the label such as 22 oz/acre for Roundup PowerMax (Note – Roundup PowerMax3 will be launched in 2022 and the standard rate is 20 oz/acre; equivalent to 22 oz/acre of the old R. PowerMax formulation).
  • Identify glyphosate or glufosinate premixes that may be in greater supply or at lower relative costs compared to solo glyphosate and glufosinate products.
  • Failure is not an option for herbicide applications. Make sure you optimize your herbicide applications using the best methods (GPA, spray nozzles, etc.), adjuvants, and minimal weed size for foliar applications.
  • Substitute alternative corn post herbicides that control grasses and broadleaves, if they don’t include a residual group 15 herbicide, add one to the postemergence mixture.
  • Cultivate if needed and/or possible.
  • Hand weed escapes prior to the weeds setting seed.
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