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Alta Seeds Brings Herbicide Tolerance To EMPYR Premier Forages

Alta Seeds, the premium seed brand of Advanta US and a leading provider of premium genetics and technology specific to sorghum, announces the first-ever herbicide-tolerant technology available in forage sorghum. Alta Seeds will feature igrowth technology for pre- and post-emergence weed control applications with IMIFLEX Herbicide in its newest forage sorghum hybrid, ADV F8484IG, a hybrid that is a member of EMPYR Premier Forages, a complete line of forage sorghum, sudangrass and sorghum-sudan hybrids.

In 2020, Alta Seeds was the first to introduce herbicide-tolerant technology for grain sorghum, representing the most significant advancement in the crop since hybridization. For the first time, sorghum growers are able to apply pre- or post-emergent herbicide to control grassy and broadleaf weeds with igrowth hybrids.

The igrowth sorghum system, fully commercialized and adopted on upwards of a half million grain sorghum acres in 2021, will now be widely available for growers’ fields in the 2022 growing season in both grain sorghum and forage sorghum hybrids.

“With the current drought impacts throughout the Great Plains, igrowth in EMPYR Premier Forages provides livestock producers with groundbreaking technology to produce high-tonnage forage sorghum, with the added benefit of targeted weed control,” says Mark Kirk, Eastern/Western Regional Account Manager, Alta Seeds. “This medium- to late-season forage hybrid offers growers more value in production of silage forage. ADV F84848IG is an ideal alternative to corn silage, as it offers reduced inputs with high yields plus nutritional content that is competitive with corn silage.

With the igrowth technology, ADV F8484IG is the first non-GMO herbicide-tolerant technology for forage sorghum. IMIFLEX Herbicide, manufactured by UPL Ltd., is the exclusive imidazolinone herbicide partner for the igrowth system. Approved by the Environmental Protection Agency in December 2020, IMIFLEX is a Group 2 herbicide that provides broad-spectrum, residual control of yield-robbing grass and broadleaf weeds, including lambsquarter, sandbur, morningglory, Texas panicum, crabgrass and foxtail. The igrowth technology allows for clean stand establishment and minimizes competition for water and nutrients, enabling maximum early season growth and weed suppression.

Feed Benefits with Excellent Standability
Not all forage sorghums are equal in performance. EMPYR Premier Forages are top-of-the-line, carefully selected hybrids that consistently outperform and outproduce in field and feed. A conventional non-BMR hybrid, ADV F8484IG offers brachytic dwarf, excellent disease resistance and high ratings for yield and standability for growers throughout the Sorghum Belt. In field trials, the hybrid yields forage equal to or greater in feed value than corn silage.

“This hybrid is an ideal selection for producers looking for next-generation technology and superior yield potential,” Kirk adds. “In a drought year like 2021, and the complications that will continue into the next growing season, forage sorghum can be a grower’s first choice for generating feed crop with a quicker turn around with an economic benefit. ADV F8484IG will only improve producer margins by controlling weeds, conserving nutrients and water usage, and improving forage quality with cleaner fields.”

EMPYR offers hybrids that fit a variety of environments, from silage production on the West Coast to haylage in the Upper Midwest, to grazing and dry hay production on the East Coast. Learn more about ADV F8484IG at http://altaseeds.advantaus.com/empyr/empyr-igrowth/ and other available hybrids at www.empyrforages.com.

Solvita Soil Tests Confirmed As Valuable Testing ToolsFor Evaluating Soil Health

Solvita Soil Tests capture key biological, chemical and physical traits indicating healthy functioning in a farm system. The usefulness of Solvita commercial soil health tests as valuable tools to predict soil health indicators such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN) has been confirmed by long term field research conducted by the University of Guelph and released in Soil and Tillage Research, September 2021.

Highlights of the research (Long-term effects of crop rotation, tillage, and fertilizer nitrogen on soil health indicators and crop productivity in a temperate climate) included:
• Diversifying rotations with perennial and cover crops increased yields
• Higher concentration of SOC, evolved CO2-C and Solvita Amino-N developed from diverse rotations
• SOC positively linked with crop yield; thus, SOC an indicator of agricultural resilience
• Solvita labile amino nitrogen (SLAN) and Solvita CO2-burst positively correlated with SOC & total nitrogen
• Applied nitrogen in diverse rotations had a synergistic effect on soil health indicators

Will Brinton, Founder and Chief Science Officer of Woods End Laboratories, commented “The study accessed two long term plot studies, providing optimal platforms to evaluate soil health test parameters. Such long-term practices provide greater confidence in distinguishing soil quality effects in laboratory analyses than reliance on short term studies. These projects reflect significant commitments of researchers supporting sustainability research objectives. Both Solvita tests (SLAN + CO2) were tested in several combinations of crops, soil management regimes and time frames confirming their usefulness in monitoring changes that are indicative of soil health improvements.”

Dr. Brinton also stated, “The study further confirms that soil health is critical to the future of society in so far as it links farming, nutrition and climate under the theme of sustainable practices.”

Woods End Laboratories has been on a mission to increase awareness of soil biology functions by developing and providing simple, accurate tools for performing soil measurements in the field and laboratory. Solvita soil tests capture key biological, chemical and physical traits indicating healthy functioning in a farm system. There are also Solvita products for compost quality testing. These products are used by soil conservationists, crop producers and compost facilities worldwide.

To learn more, visit the Woods End Laboratories’ Solvita website at www.solvita.com.

About Woods End Laboratories
Woods End is a leading soil health research company founded in 1974, that has focused on creating products, process and consulting for agriculture, compost and other soil health initiatives. It’s flagship brand, Solvita, is a leading soil health diagnostic product being adopted in both North American and international markets. Founded by Dr. Will Brinton, Woods End’s vision is built upon soil health, agricultural sustainability and circular economy principles. Will Brinton has served a decade on the OMRI advisory council which interacts with the USDA on certified organic farming issues.

The company developed and distributes the Solvita brand of products used by agronomists, conservationists, researchers and others worldwide to monitor soil health, foodstuff spoilage and compost stability. The company recently joined forces with A&L Canada Laboratories Inc. and Deveron Corp. in April of 2021 to create a new soil health and precision ag service platform; https://woodsend.com/2021/04/deveron-and-al-canada/.

Visit the Woods End Laboratory website at www.woodsend.com.

Lawsuit Filed Against EPA For Approval Of New BASF Herbicide

The Center for Food Safety and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of trifludimoxazin, an herbicide intended for pre- and/or post-emergent control of broadleaf and grass weeds. BASF defended the safety of the herbicide ingredient and need for additional weed management options for farmers.

As farmers continue to face weed resistance issues, BASF sought registration for its herbicide Tirexor, the first new mode of action for burndown of grass weeds in 20 years. Trifludimoxazin is the active ingredient in the herbicide, although the product is not yet available in the United States.

The groups’ lawsuit alleges EPA violated the Endangered Species Act and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act by discounting impacts of spray drift and runoff to terrestrial and aquatic plants, fish, and threatened and endangered species.

As a highly complementary and compatible mixing partner, it features durable residual activity and displays strong performance on weeds with low use rates. Additionally, it is flexible enough for use on multiple crops. Targeted crop and non-crop opportunities include corn, soybean, cereals, peanut, citrus, pome fruit, tree nuts, oil palm, pulse crops and total vegetation management.

Miracle King-Wilson, public relations manager for BASF Agricultural Solutions of North America, notes the registration EPA provided for the product in May of this year was the result of more than 32 months of evaluation by the EPA.

“BASF continues to work alongside the EPA to provide the necessary information and data it requires to approve these types of registrations, and as the authority on these matters, we stand by its decision with regard to the benefits and safety of these products when used according to their labels,” King-Wilson notes.

BASF explains Tirexor works by inhibiting the enzyme protoporphyrinogen oxidase thereby disrupting the cell membrane of plants. It uses a novel binding mechanism for optimal control and burndown of broadleaf and grass weeds, which have encountered significant weed resistance issues.

“Growers continue to need solutions and technologies to control their toughest weeds. BASF believes in the value these herbicides can add to farming operations across the country, which is why we continue to invest in bringing these solutions to market following the regulatory requirements administered by authorities like the EPA,” King-Wilson says.

The environmental groups claim the agency admitted in its response to public comments that it was ignoring the clear requirements of the law, leaving endangered species without any protections for potentially a decade or more. Some endangered species at risk from trifludimoxazin include the Monarch butterfly, Chinook salmon, rusty-patched bumblebee, and other fish, insects and wild plants. There are also concerns about potential impacts to aquatic plants and organisms, as there is currently no mitigation to address runoff.

“It’s disappointing that even with the change in administration, EPA is continuing to approve new pesticides that harm the environment, farmers, endangered species, and human health-without a thorough consideration of these harms,” says Amy van Saun, senior attorney at the Center for Food Safety. “EPA admits that spray drift and runoff of trifludimoxazin are likely to cause damage to non-target crops, wild plants, and fish, yet it failed to implement measures that could help to reduce those risks.”

The environmental groups claim trifludimoxazin is roughly ten times more potent on soybeans than dicamba, the herbicide whose spray and vapor drift and runoff has caused unprecedented damage across many millions of acres of soybeans the past several years. Dicamba’s previous approval was vacated by the Ninth Circuit just last year; CFS and allies’ lawsuit challenging dicamba’s most recent registration is currently under review in the Ninth Circuit.

“EPA’s approval of trifludimoxazin is incredibly irresponsible, since its own analysis shows this herbicide will cause considerable drift damage to plants over 1,000 feet from field’s edge, with absolutely no buffer zones or other effective measures to protect these plants or the organisms that depend on them,” says Bill Freese, science director at the Center for Food Safety.

The EPA’s registration decision and label contain very little in the way of mandatory mitigation measures, increasing the likelihood of harm when the herbicide is applied in real-world conditions, the environmental groups add. The registration of trifludimoxazin will allow it to be used on many major crops as well as on large amounts of sensitive non-agricultural areas. This broad registration means it may be used on millions of acres and pose a significant risk to protected and non-protected plants and the wildlife that depend on them. It will also result in significant risks to fish, the environmental groups claim.

Farmers’ Markets Easier to Find

Alberta Approved Farmers’ Market App now available for download.

The process of finding a farmers’ market in the province is made easy through Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s mobile app and website – sunnygirl.ca. The site and app have all the pertinent information on where approved farmers’ markets are located, when they operate, and their contact information.

‘Almost 80% of Alberta households shop in this market channel with customers spending about $70 per visit,’ says Eileen Kotowich, farmers’ market specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. ‘More than 80% of this is spent on local food.’

Kotowich adds that with a minimum of 80% of vendors making, baking or growing the products they are selling, Alberta approved farmers’ markets are a great way for small entrepreneurs to test their products, ideas and learn valuable business skills.

Currently, Alberta has more than 150 Alberta approved farmers’ markets serving over 100 communities.

Contact

For more information, connect with Eileen Kotowich:

Hours: 8:15 am to 4:30 pm (open Monday to Friday, closed statutory holidays)
Phone: 780-853-8223
Toll free: 310-0000 before the phone number (in Alberta)
Email: eileen.kotowich@gov.ab.ca

OFA addresses uncontrolled electricity issues with industry working group, By Larry Davis, Director, Ontario Federation of Agriculture

OFA Viewpoint

OFA addresses uncontrolled electricity issues with industry working group

By Larry Davis, Director, Ontario Federation of Agriculture  

A lot of the problems that occur on a farm are tangible, meaning there is a direct cause and effect as to what the problem is. For example, a dysfunctional grain leg, broken-down equipment or a fence that needs mending. These are all obvious issues that we try to resolve right away to prevent a lack of productivity. But, what about the issues we don’t see?  

Stray voltage and ground current are persistent electrical issues for livestock farmers that can be highly misunderstood, misidentified and cause severe negative impacts to the health of both livestock and farmers. I have seen the impact on cattle, poultry, swine and other animals, as well as farm families. 

When I was youngster working in my parents’ dairy barn, I could feel it when I cleaned out the water bowls. We called it tingle voltage or stray voltage. It wasn’t until years later that I understood what it really was and how serious it can be to the health of our livestock. 

When animals are exposed to low-level currents travelling through the ground, especially over a long period of time, their well-being and life span is directly impacted. To avoid the current, animals may refuse to eat or drink, cows may refuse to enter milking stations, reproductive issues can occur, low birth weight and even death can persist among a herd. The impact of uncontrolled electricity is heightened when an animal has open sores by intensifying the sensation and increasing pain at the site.  

This chronic suffering can bring mental anguish to many farmers because at the end of the day, we all want to raise healthy, content livestock which is highly influenced by living conditions. Additionally, a decline of productivity in livestock adds a financial burden to farm businesses and has the potential to threaten the viability of the farm. From experience with our family farm business, we were not able to identify and overcome the stray voltage challenge which put us out of business.  

The Uncontrolled Electricity Working Group (UEWG) was formed to help tackle and mitigate issues related to chronic exposure of uncontrolled electricity. The Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA) is a key member of this working group, tasked with addressing electrical issues that have been a serious concern for some farmers for decades.  

The mission of the UEWG is to ensure the health and well-being of Ontario livestock by working to mitigate issues related to chronic exposure of uncontrolled electricity. The goal is also to bring greater awareness to this issue, which has persisted for decades and fails to acquire adequate attention.  

Beginning our work in 2007, the UEWG has made significant progress improving communication and understanding between farmers and the Ontario Energy Board (OEB). Distribution System Code Appendix H was published, which acknowledges stray voltage and standardizes the way farms are tested. Until this group was established, stray voltage was not recognized as an issue and once the farming community became aware of the problem, it was difficult to explain to electrical service groups.  

Stray voltage on farms typically amounts to no more than one volt. Although this amount of current has negative effects on livestock, electrical service groups typically deal with thousands of uncontrolled volts along the distribution system. Testing of stray voltage would show there was less than one volt of uncontrolled electricity, which by the Electrical Safety Code, does not require a call for action. The UEWG worked with Hydro One to develop their Farm Rapid Response Team, which includes consistently trained field staff that are experts in understanding farm related electrical issues. This creates a support system at the ground level for farmers to get in touch with and immediately respond to on-farm electrical problems.  

Now that our group has been established for more than eight years, we are starting to collect more data through our research. Eventually, this research may be able to point to certain areas in Ontario that stray voltage is more problematic, and what type of livestock is most impacted. It’s very difficult to see farmers within our communities experiencing this frustrating challenge. Farmers often blame themselves for poor herd health and spend a significant amount of time, finances and energy to eradicate problems among their herd. In these situations, however, it motivates us to find solutions and work with experts to ensure we mitigate this issue in the future. A growing number of farmers, industry stakeholders and electrical representatives are improving their understanding of this problem and learning how to address it.  

The UEWG, created by OFA, is made up of farmers, veterinarians, livestock commodity group representatives and farm organizations. Our group relies on the expertise of these rural voices as well as an electrician and electrical engineer. We work closely with the Electrical Safety Authority and the Ontario Ministries of Energy and Agriculture. Together this group offers a balanced perspective of the needs of farmers and what improvements can be made through testing and electrical infrastructure. OFA has contributed a significant amount of time, and representatives like me, have worked hard to meet the needs of farmers across Ontario. Financial contributions have been made to fund research to continue the exploration of viable options and solutions.  

The Member of Provincial Parliament for Chatham-Kent-Leamington, Rick Nicholls, has recently established a group within the Ontario government to develop best practices on protection from stray voltage on farms. This group also acknowledges that livestock have been suffering for decades due to uncontrolled electricity and will rely on research we have acquired over the years to improve testing and ground current monitoring. With aligning goals, our group is optimistic that immense progress will be achieved to serve the needs and priorities of Ontario farmers and their livestock. 

Syngenta Releases New Acuron GT Premix For Corn

As weeds overcome existing technologies on the market and build resistance to them, herbicide manufacturers are researching new ways to stop their progress. One method companies are using is formulating and packaging a combination of active ingredients and sites of action. That’s a strategy Syngenta is employing with its new Acuron GT premix herbicide for use in corn.

The herbicide offers four active ingredients – bicyclophyrone (Group 27), mesotrione (Group 27), s-metolachlor (Group 15) and glyphosate (Group 9).

The herbicide works through three sites of action, offering a fortified front against broadleaf weeds and some grasses:

• Bicyclophyrone and mesotrione are HPPD inhibitors, often referred to as “bleacher” herbicides.

• S-metolachlor works by inhibiting the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids.

• Glyphosate inhibits a plant enzyme (EPSP) that plays a role in the synthesis of three amino acids – phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan.

Acuron GT averages greater than 90% postemergence control on large-seeded broadleaves and small-seeded broadleaves, according to Ryan Lins, research and development scientist for Syngenta, based in Minnesota. In some scenarios, the herbicide approaches 99% postemergence control.

“In particular, its higher-level control of large-seeded broadleaves such as giant ragweed, morningglory and cocklebur, and pigweed species like Palmer amaranth and waterhemp, really sets Acuron GT apart from all other post-emergence-plus-residual herbicides,” he says.

Application Flexibility

Scott Cully, Syngenta research and development scientist in Illinois, says compared to Halex GT, farmers in his area are seeing a 14% increase in residual control of Palmer amaranth between 42 and 56 days after treatment.

The longer residual gives farmers and retailers more flexibility on when they can apply the new premix.

“They don’t have to wait for weeds to emerge to make an application,” Cully says. “They can actually spray it earlier than they may have felt comfortable with (when using) previous products.”

The company recommends using Acuron GT, as part of a two-pass program, before weeds exceed 4″ to minimize potential yield losses.

“Based on the data, if we let the weeds get up to a 10″ height, we’ve lost approximately 15% yield of that corn,” Cully says, for example. “If you think about that in terms of a 200-bushel corn crop, that would become a 170-bushel crop.”

Company officials add that in 16 head-to-head replicated trials in glyphosate-tolerant corn, Acuron GT provided an average yield increase of up to 8 bu. per acre versus other post-emergence-plus-residual herbicides.

“That can be attributed to a combination of its safety and efficacy,” Cully says.

Unique Formulation

Matt Lehman, Syngenta formulation chemist, says Acuron GT has more than 20 different formulation components along with the latest in encapsulation technology, making it one of the most effective yet challenging herbicides the company has developed.

“It was difficult because it combines four active ingredients in different forms – a salt, two acids and an oil,” Lehman says. “Our team used various advanced formulation tactics to provide the stability and handling performance our customers require.”

Product formulations are important for growers to consider in the process of selecting herbicides, he says because they often differ between branded products and generics.

“A lot of what formulation chemists and engineers do is fight gravity by manipulating how solids and liquids interact,” he says.

While the product was available for application on a limited basis this season, company officials anticipate Acuron GT will be available for wide-scale use by farmers in 44 states for 2022.

New Holland Launches NutriSense Nutrient Analysis Technology Enhancements

Farmers are constantly looking for ways to do more with less: improve the quality of their crop while optimizing the use of inputs, preserving the health of the soil and reducing the environmental impact of their activities. It’s a delicate balancing act where advanced technologies can make all the difference.

New Holland’s NutriSense) system is one of them: awarded the Silver Medal at the SIMA Innovation Awards 2021, this innovation provides farmers with valuable measurements of crop moisture, starch, crude protein, fiber (ADF and NDF), ash and crude fat content in every area of their field. The farmer can visualize this agronomic data with an intuitive, user-friendly interface on their MyPLM Connect portal and use it to make informed decisions that will enable them to market their crops most profitably.

Eduardo Nicz, PLM Product Marketing Global, explains: “Our strategy at New Holland is to integrate digital technologies to deliver a smart and connected agriculture to our customers, with easy-to-use solutions. The NutriSense system is an excellent example: it provides farmers with detailed agronomic data collected by their New Holland combine or forage harvesters in the field. This will enable them to use their inputs most efficiently and harvest a crop they will sell at better prices.”

The NutriSense system on New Holland’s FR Forage Cruiser can help the livestock farmer or contractor in different phases of the farming cycle, starting from understanding and managing field health and performance using year-on-year field data. They can also use the measurements collected by the machine to determine if there is soil contamination in the forage, so they can add a safeguard for the livestock.

At harvest time, the crop moisture data supports the farmer’s decision making on animal feed storage. The crude protein, crude fat and starch content of the crop enables them to improve the animal feed ration content and quality. The result is a healthier, more productive field and high-quality animal feed for the farmer’s livestock or for the contractor to sell at a higher price.

Cash crop farmers operating a New Holland CR or a CX7 and CX8 Combine with NutriSense will benefit too from the year-on-year field data to manage the health and performance of their fields. Understanding the crop protein levels across their field can be very useful when calculating fertilizer application rates for the following seasons, optimizing the use of inputs. The protein content in the grain enables the farmer to determine whether the crop is suitable for animal feed or for milling wheat, which sells at a higher price.

Knowing the value of their crop at harvest will also help them decide how to store the crop. The levels of crop nutrients such as starch also determine whether the crop is suitable for bio-fuel production. With the increasing demand for this sustainable fuel, this can represent an interesting revenue stream.

Lars Skjoldager Sørensen, Crop Harvesting Product Management Global, comments: “New Holland CR, CX7 and CX8 combines deliver massive capacity with outstanding grain quality. The NutriSense system gives our customers an additional advantage: the detailed information on nutrients enables them to optimize the use of inputs, determine the best way to manage their crop, and understand value of their crop to obtain the best price for it.”

Visualization of data from the NutriSense system is the latest addition to the continually expanding array of features and functionalities of the MyPLM Connect Farm app designed to help farmers optimize the performance, productivity and profitability of their operation.

Bayer’s Paul Nelson Named Seed World’s “2021 Future Giant Of Seed Industry”

Seed World magazine is excited to announce the 2021 Future Giant of the Seed Industry Paul Nelson. He serves as a corn product design lead at Bayer and was selected for this award because of his leadership and vision for the future of plant breeding.

For the past 10 years, the Seed World editorial board honors an individual who has demonstrated excellence in their field of work, a commitment to the seed industry and leadership above and beyond the job description.

“I have worked with Paul for over ten years, the last five as the leader of the team that Paul is a part of,” says Jonathan Jenkinson, head of product design at Bayer. “There are few people I’ve known in my career who have added as much or been a greater pleasure to work with. I believe Paul is very worthy of this award.”

Starting his career as a corn breeder in Iowa, Nelson spent eight years managing a breeding program for central corn belt maturities.

“That was my dream job,” Nelson says, “everything from walking plots and managing nurseries to slogging through data during harvest, but when I was presented with opportunities to influence at a broader level, I made the tough decision to ‘hang up the boots’ and move into leadership.”

Now based in Chesterfield, Mo., Nelson has lead teams in data science, genomic prediction, and is now managing one of Bayer’s global breeding pipelines.

In addition to leading his team of scientists at Bayer, focused on developing new corn hybrids for growers, Paul is also actively engaged across the seed industry. He chaired the American Seed trade Association’s molecular marker working group for five years where he coordinated research and publications from that group, has influenced international plant intellectual property (IP) policy at UPOV and ISF, and currently sits on the U.S. Plant Variety Protection Board. Through these efforts, he has helped breeders to achieve more efficient and quicker IP for improved maize hybrids and soybeans varieties.

“What makes a good leader is someone who’s less focused on position and moving up, but instead is passionate about the science and focused on the people they lead,” Nelson says. “When I started my career all I cared about was seeing hybrids from my own breeding program on farmer’s fields; that was highly motivating and a lot of fun. But through different opportunities my career has taken an exciting path away from an individual breeding program. Now, I’m able to influence strategy and lead a team that gets the most out of our data and germplasm and allows us to create even better product for our growers. I’m very fortunate to be where I am today.”

Nufarm Announces Launch Of Leopard Herbicide

Nufarm Americas Inc. is pleased to announce the launch of Leopard™ Herbicide. Leopard is the latest in Nufarm’s portfolio of innovative herbicides formulated to deliver exceptional planting flexibility for soybeans, field corn and cotton.

Leopard’s dual-active formulation boosts foliar activity and adds residual to burndown applications, so fields stay clean up to planting. Leopard lets you keep your crop options open – so you can make crop decisions based on weather conditions and commodity price fluctuation.

“Based on SU chemistry, and with a superior granular formulation, Leopard provides growers with another fall or early spring option in their efforts to manage herbicide resistance, particularly prior to planting soybeans, corn and cotton,” said Chris Bowley, Customer & Brand Marketing Manager. “With excellent residual activity, Leopard is an ideal tank-mix partner for many foundational burndown products. Also, the label allows corn growers even more flexibility as the application window for corn extends all the way up to planting.”

As mentioned, Leopard is a highly compatible tank-mix partner for burndown herbicides like glyphosate and 2,4-D due to its low-use rate. It may be applied 30 to 45 days prior to planting for increased cropping flexibility – and is available for purchase from Nufarm Channel partners commencing mid-July.

Leopard herbicide is the latest addition to the Nufarm’s growing list of herbicides that farmers can use for weed management year round, from “Harvest to Canopy™”. For information about all of the crop protection solutions available from Nufarm, visit nufarm.com/uscrop.

About Nufarm

Established in Australia more than 100 years ago, Nufarm is recognized as one of the leading manufacturers and suppliers of crop protection and seed treatment in the world. In the US, Nufarm is committed to bringing innovation and choice to distributors, retailers and the growers they serve from three state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities located to serve the North American channel with planning and precision.

Corteva Agriscience Leveraging Mobile Robots To Walk Row Crops

Corteva Agriscience is working to take agricultural robotics to new heights using a Spot robot from Boston Dynamics. The company is among the first in agriculture to use this platform to ‘walk’ between rows of corn, sunflowers and other crops.

The robot has potential applications in field testing of both new seed and crop protection solutions with its ability to autonomously collect data, support the application of new crop protection discovery molecules, and inspect operations.

Spot’s many capabilities can help Corteva better understand complex phenotypes to support its research and development selection processes. Spot robots automate sensing and inspection, capture data, and explore without boundaries, making operations safer, more efficient and predictable.

Corteva is also collaborating with Trimble for the initial proof-of-concept and to integrate precise GPS guidance technologies with the platform. The jointly developed solution combines the mobility of the Spot robot with Trimble’s autonomous navigation capabilities and Corteva’s approach to helping farmers overcome agriculture’s most pressing challenges.

Alta Seeds Brings Herbicide Tolerance To EMPYR Premier Forages

Alta Seeds, the premium seed brand of Advanta US and a leading provider of premium genetics and technology specific to sorghum, announces the first-ever herbicide-tolerant technology available in forage sorghum. Alta Seeds will feature igrowth technology for pre- and post-emergence weed control applications with IMIFLEX Herbicide in its newest forage sorghum hybrid, ADV F8484IG, a hybrid that is a member of EMPYR Premier Forages, a complete line of forage sorghum, sudangrass and sorghum-sudan hybrids.

In 2020, Alta Seeds was the first to introduce herbicide-tolerant technology for grain sorghum, representing the most significant advancement in the crop since hybridization. For the first time, sorghum growers are able to apply pre- or post-emergent herbicide to control grassy and broadleaf weeds with igrowth hybrids.

The igrowth sorghum system, fully commercialized and adopted on upwards of a half million grain sorghum acres in 2021, will now be widely available for growers’ fields in the 2022 growing season in both grain sorghum and forage sorghum hybrids.

“With the current drought impacts throughout the Great Plains, igrowth in EMPYR Premier Forages provides livestock producers with groundbreaking technology to produce high-tonnage forage sorghum, with the added benefit of targeted weed control,” says Mark Kirk, Eastern/Western Regional Account Manager, Alta Seeds. “This medium- to late-season forage hybrid offers growers more value in production of silage forage. ADV F84848IG is an ideal alternative to corn silage, as it offers reduced inputs with high yields plus nutritional content that is competitive with corn silage.

With the igrowth technology, ADV F8484IG is the first non-GMO herbicide-tolerant technology for forage sorghum. IMIFLEX Herbicide, manufactured by UPL Ltd., is the exclusive imidazolinone herbicide partner for the igrowth system. Approved by the Environmental Protection Agency in December 2020, IMIFLEX is a Group 2 herbicide that provides broad-spectrum, residual control of yield-robbing grass and broadleaf weeds, including lambsquarter, sandbur, morningglory, Texas panicum, crabgrass and foxtail. The igrowth technology allows for clean stand establishment and minimizes competition for water and nutrients, enabling maximum early season growth and weed suppression.

Feed Benefits with Excellent Standability
Not all forage sorghums are equal in performance. EMPYR Premier Forages are top-of-the-line, carefully selected hybrids that consistently outperform and outproduce in field and feed. A conventional non-BMR hybrid, ADV F8484IG offers brachytic dwarf, excellent disease resistance and high ratings for yield and standability for growers throughout the Sorghum Belt. In field trials, the hybrid yields forage equal to or greater in feed value than corn silage.

“This hybrid is an ideal selection for producers looking for next-generation technology and superior yield potential,” Kirk adds. “In a drought year like 2021, and the complications that will continue into the next growing season, forage sorghum can be a grower’s first choice for generating feed crop with a quicker turn around with an economic benefit. ADV F8484IG will only improve producer margins by controlling weeds, conserving nutrients and water usage, and improving forage quality with cleaner fields.”

EMPYR offers hybrids that fit a variety of environments, from silage production on the West Coast to haylage in the Upper Midwest, to grazing and dry hay production on the East Coast. Learn more about ADV F8484IG at http://altaseeds.advantaus.com/empyr/empyr-igrowth/ and other available hybrids at www.empyrforages.com.

Solvita Soil Tests Confirmed As Valuable Testing ToolsFor Evaluating Soil Health

Solvita Soil Tests capture key biological, chemical and physical traits indicating healthy functioning in a farm system. The usefulness of Solvita commercial soil health tests as valuable tools to predict soil health indicators such as Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) and Total Nitrogen (TN) has been confirmed by long term field research conducted by the University of Guelph and released in Soil and Tillage Research, September 2021.

Highlights of the research (Long-term effects of crop rotation, tillage, and fertilizer nitrogen on soil health indicators and crop productivity in a temperate climate) included:
• Diversifying rotations with perennial and cover crops increased yields
• Higher concentration of SOC, evolved CO2-C and Solvita Amino-N developed from diverse rotations
• SOC positively linked with crop yield; thus, SOC an indicator of agricultural resilience
• Solvita labile amino nitrogen (SLAN) and Solvita CO2-burst positively correlated with SOC & total nitrogen
• Applied nitrogen in diverse rotations had a synergistic effect on soil health indicators

Will Brinton, Founder and Chief Science Officer of Woods End Laboratories, commented “The study accessed two long term plot studies, providing optimal platforms to evaluate soil health test parameters. Such long-term practices provide greater confidence in distinguishing soil quality effects in laboratory analyses than reliance on short term studies. These projects reflect significant commitments of researchers supporting sustainability research objectives. Both Solvita tests (SLAN + CO2) were tested in several combinations of crops, soil management regimes and time frames confirming their usefulness in monitoring changes that are indicative of soil health improvements.”

Dr. Brinton also stated, “The study further confirms that soil health is critical to the future of society in so far as it links farming, nutrition and climate under the theme of sustainable practices.”

Woods End Laboratories has been on a mission to increase awareness of soil biology functions by developing and providing simple, accurate tools for performing soil measurements in the field and laboratory. Solvita soil tests capture key biological, chemical and physical traits indicating healthy functioning in a farm system. There are also Solvita products for compost quality testing. These products are used by soil conservationists, crop producers and compost facilities worldwide.

To learn more, visit the Woods End Laboratories’ Solvita website at www.solvita.com.

About Woods End Laboratories
Woods End is a leading soil health research company founded in 1974, that has focused on creating products, process and consulting for agriculture, compost and other soil health initiatives. It’s flagship brand, Solvita, is a leading soil health diagnostic product being adopted in both North American and international markets. Founded by Dr. Will Brinton, Woods End’s vision is built upon soil health, agricultural sustainability and circular economy principles. Will Brinton has served a decade on the OMRI advisory council which interacts with the USDA on certified organic farming issues.

The company developed and distributes the Solvita brand of products used by agronomists, conservationists, researchers and others worldwide to monitor soil health, foodstuff spoilage and compost stability. The company recently joined forces with A&L Canada Laboratories Inc. and Deveron Corp. in April of 2021 to create a new soil health and precision ag service platform; https://woodsend.com/2021/04/deveron-and-al-canada/.

Visit the Woods End Laboratory website at www.woodsend.com.

Lawsuit Filed Against EPA For Approval Of New BASF Herbicide

The Center for Food Safety and the Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of trifludimoxazin, an herbicide intended for pre- and/or post-emergent control of broadleaf and grass weeds. BASF defended the safety of the herbicide ingredient and need for additional weed management options for farmers.

As farmers continue to face weed resistance issues, BASF sought registration for its herbicide Tirexor, the first new mode of action for burndown of grass weeds in 20 years. Trifludimoxazin is the active ingredient in the herbicide, although the product is not yet available in the United States.

The groups’ lawsuit alleges EPA violated the Endangered Species Act and the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act by discounting impacts of spray drift and runoff to terrestrial and aquatic plants, fish, and threatened and endangered species.

As a highly complementary and compatible mixing partner, it features durable residual activity and displays strong performance on weeds with low use rates. Additionally, it is flexible enough for use on multiple crops. Targeted crop and non-crop opportunities include corn, soybean, cereals, peanut, citrus, pome fruit, tree nuts, oil palm, pulse crops and total vegetation management.

Miracle King-Wilson, public relations manager for BASF Agricultural Solutions of North America, notes the registration EPA provided for the product in May of this year was the result of more than 32 months of evaluation by the EPA.

“BASF continues to work alongside the EPA to provide the necessary information and data it requires to approve these types of registrations, and as the authority on these matters, we stand by its decision with regard to the benefits and safety of these products when used according to their labels,” King-Wilson notes.

BASF explains Tirexor works by inhibiting the enzyme protoporphyrinogen oxidase thereby disrupting the cell membrane of plants. It uses a novel binding mechanism for optimal control and burndown of broadleaf and grass weeds, which have encountered significant weed resistance issues.

“Growers continue to need solutions and technologies to control their toughest weeds. BASF believes in the value these herbicides can add to farming operations across the country, which is why we continue to invest in bringing these solutions to market following the regulatory requirements administered by authorities like the EPA,” King-Wilson says.

The environmental groups claim the agency admitted in its response to public comments that it was ignoring the clear requirements of the law, leaving endangered species without any protections for potentially a decade or more. Some endangered species at risk from trifludimoxazin include the Monarch butterfly, Chinook salmon, rusty-patched bumblebee, and other fish, insects and wild plants. There are also concerns about potential impacts to aquatic plants and organisms, as there is currently no mitigation to address runoff.

“It’s disappointing that even with the change in administration, EPA is continuing to approve new pesticides that harm the environment, farmers, endangered species, and human health-without a thorough consideration of these harms,” says Amy van Saun, senior attorney at the Center for Food Safety. “EPA admits that spray drift and runoff of trifludimoxazin are likely to cause damage to non-target crops, wild plants, and fish, yet it failed to implement measures that could help to reduce those risks.”

The environmental groups claim trifludimoxazin is roughly ten times more potent on soybeans than dicamba, the herbicide whose spray and vapor drift and runoff has caused unprecedented damage across many millions of acres of soybeans the past several years. Dicamba’s previous approval was vacated by the Ninth Circuit just last year; CFS and allies’ lawsuit challenging dicamba’s most recent registration is currently under review in the Ninth Circuit.

“EPA’s approval of trifludimoxazin is incredibly irresponsible, since its own analysis shows this herbicide will cause considerable drift damage to plants over 1,000 feet from field’s edge, with absolutely no buffer zones or other effective measures to protect these plants or the organisms that depend on them,” says Bill Freese, science director at the Center for Food Safety.

The EPA’s registration decision and label contain very little in the way of mandatory mitigation measures, increasing the likelihood of harm when the herbicide is applied in real-world conditions, the environmental groups add. The registration of trifludimoxazin will allow it to be used on many major crops as well as on large amounts of sensitive non-agricultural areas. This broad registration means it may be used on millions of acres and pose a significant risk to protected and non-protected plants and the wildlife that depend on them. It will also result in significant risks to fish, the environmental groups claim.

Farmers’ Markets Easier to Find

Alberta Approved Farmers’ Market App now available for download.

The process of finding a farmers’ market in the province is made easy through Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s mobile app and website – sunnygirl.ca. The site and app have all the pertinent information on where approved farmers’ markets are located, when they operate, and their contact information.

‘Almost 80% of Alberta households shop in this market channel with customers spending about $70 per visit,’ says Eileen Kotowich, farmers’ market specialist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. ‘More than 80% of this is spent on local food.’

Kotowich adds that with a minimum of 80% of vendors making, baking or growing the products they are selling, Alberta approved farmers’ markets are a great way for small entrepreneurs to test their products, ideas and learn valuable business skills.

Currently, Alberta has more than 150 Alberta approved farmers’ markets serving over 100 communities.

Contact

For more information, connect with Eileen Kotowich:

Hours: 8:15 am to 4:30 pm (open Monday to Friday, closed statutory holidays)
Phone: 780-853-8223
Toll free: 310-0000 before the phone number (in Alberta)
Email: eileen.kotowich@gov.ab.ca

OFA addresses uncontrolled electricity issues with industry working group, By Larry Davis, Director, Ontario Federation of Agriculture

OFA Viewpoint

OFA addresses uncontrolled electricity issues with industry working group

By Larry Davis, Director, Ontario Federation of Agriculture  

A lot of the problems that occur on a farm are tangible, meaning there is a direct cause and effect as to what the problem is. For example, a dysfunctional grain leg, broken-down equipment or a fence that needs mending. These are all obvious issues that we try to resolve right away to prevent a lack of productivity. But, what about the issues we don’t see?  

Stray voltage and ground current are persistent electrical issues for livestock farmers that can be highly misunderstood, misidentified and cause severe negative impacts to the health of both livestock and farmers. I have seen the impact on cattle, poultry, swine and other animals, as well as farm families. 

When I was youngster working in my parents’ dairy barn, I could feel it when I cleaned out the water bowls. We called it tingle voltage or stray voltage. It wasn’t until years later that I understood what it really was and how serious it can be to the health of our livestock. 

When animals are exposed to low-level currents travelling through the ground, especially over a long period of time, their well-being and life span is directly impacted. To avoid the current, animals may refuse to eat or drink, cows may refuse to enter milking stations, reproductive issues can occur, low birth weight and even death can persist among a herd. The impact of uncontrolled electricity is heightened when an animal has open sores by intensifying the sensation and increasing pain at the site.  

This chronic suffering can bring mental anguish to many farmers because at the end of the day, we all want to raise healthy, content livestock which is highly influenced by living conditions. Additionally, a decline of productivity in livestock adds a financial burden to farm businesses and has the potential to threaten the viability of the farm. From experience with our family farm business, we were not able to identify and overcome the stray voltage challenge which put us out of business.  

The Uncontrolled Electricity Working Group (UEWG) was formed to help tackle and mitigate issues related to chronic exposure of uncontrolled electricity. The Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA) is a key member of this working group, tasked with addressing electrical issues that have been a serious concern for some farmers for decades.  

The mission of the UEWG is to ensure the health and well-being of Ontario livestock by working to mitigate issues related to chronic exposure of uncontrolled electricity. The goal is also to bring greater awareness to this issue, which has persisted for decades and fails to acquire adequate attention.  

Beginning our work in 2007, the UEWG has made significant progress improving communication and understanding between farmers and the Ontario Energy Board (OEB). Distribution System Code Appendix H was published, which acknowledges stray voltage and standardizes the way farms are tested. Until this group was established, stray voltage was not recognized as an issue and once the farming community became aware of the problem, it was difficult to explain to electrical service groups.  

Stray voltage on farms typically amounts to no more than one volt. Although this amount of current has negative effects on livestock, electrical service groups typically deal with thousands of uncontrolled volts along the distribution system. Testing of stray voltage would show there was less than one volt of uncontrolled electricity, which by the Electrical Safety Code, does not require a call for action. The UEWG worked with Hydro One to develop their Farm Rapid Response Team, which includes consistently trained field staff that are experts in understanding farm related electrical issues. This creates a support system at the ground level for farmers to get in touch with and immediately respond to on-farm electrical problems.  

Now that our group has been established for more than eight years, we are starting to collect more data through our research. Eventually, this research may be able to point to certain areas in Ontario that stray voltage is more problematic, and what type of livestock is most impacted. It’s very difficult to see farmers within our communities experiencing this frustrating challenge. Farmers often blame themselves for poor herd health and spend a significant amount of time, finances and energy to eradicate problems among their herd. In these situations, however, it motivates us to find solutions and work with experts to ensure we mitigate this issue in the future. A growing number of farmers, industry stakeholders and electrical representatives are improving their understanding of this problem and learning how to address it.  

The UEWG, created by OFA, is made up of farmers, veterinarians, livestock commodity group representatives and farm organizations. Our group relies on the expertise of these rural voices as well as an electrician and electrical engineer. We work closely with the Electrical Safety Authority and the Ontario Ministries of Energy and Agriculture. Together this group offers a balanced perspective of the needs of farmers and what improvements can be made through testing and electrical infrastructure. OFA has contributed a significant amount of time, and representatives like me, have worked hard to meet the needs of farmers across Ontario. Financial contributions have been made to fund research to continue the exploration of viable options and solutions.  

The Member of Provincial Parliament for Chatham-Kent-Leamington, Rick Nicholls, has recently established a group within the Ontario government to develop best practices on protection from stray voltage on farms. This group also acknowledges that livestock have been suffering for decades due to uncontrolled electricity and will rely on research we have acquired over the years to improve testing and ground current monitoring. With aligning goals, our group is optimistic that immense progress will be achieved to serve the needs and priorities of Ontario farmers and their livestock. 

Syngenta Releases New Acuron GT Premix For Corn

As weeds overcome existing technologies on the market and build resistance to them, herbicide manufacturers are researching new ways to stop their progress. One method companies are using is formulating and packaging a combination of active ingredients and sites of action. That’s a strategy Syngenta is employing with its new Acuron GT premix herbicide for use in corn.

The herbicide offers four active ingredients – bicyclophyrone (Group 27), mesotrione (Group 27), s-metolachlor (Group 15) and glyphosate (Group 9).

The herbicide works through three sites of action, offering a fortified front against broadleaf weeds and some grasses:

• Bicyclophyrone and mesotrione are HPPD inhibitors, often referred to as “bleacher” herbicides.

• S-metolachlor works by inhibiting the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids.

• Glyphosate inhibits a plant enzyme (EPSP) that plays a role in the synthesis of three amino acids – phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan.

Acuron GT averages greater than 90% postemergence control on large-seeded broadleaves and small-seeded broadleaves, according to Ryan Lins, research and development scientist for Syngenta, based in Minnesota. In some scenarios, the herbicide approaches 99% postemergence control.

“In particular, its higher-level control of large-seeded broadleaves such as giant ragweed, morningglory and cocklebur, and pigweed species like Palmer amaranth and waterhemp, really sets Acuron GT apart from all other post-emergence-plus-residual herbicides,” he says.

Application Flexibility

Scott Cully, Syngenta research and development scientist in Illinois, says compared to Halex GT, farmers in his area are seeing a 14% increase in residual control of Palmer amaranth between 42 and 56 days after treatment.

The longer residual gives farmers and retailers more flexibility on when they can apply the new premix.

“They don’t have to wait for weeds to emerge to make an application,” Cully says. “They can actually spray it earlier than they may have felt comfortable with (when using) previous products.”

The company recommends using Acuron GT, as part of a two-pass program, before weeds exceed 4″ to minimize potential yield losses.

“Based on the data, if we let the weeds get up to a 10″ height, we’ve lost approximately 15% yield of that corn,” Cully says, for example. “If you think about that in terms of a 200-bushel corn crop, that would become a 170-bushel crop.”

Company officials add that in 16 head-to-head replicated trials in glyphosate-tolerant corn, Acuron GT provided an average yield increase of up to 8 bu. per acre versus other post-emergence-plus-residual herbicides.

“That can be attributed to a combination of its safety and efficacy,” Cully says.

Unique Formulation

Matt Lehman, Syngenta formulation chemist, says Acuron GT has more than 20 different formulation components along with the latest in encapsulation technology, making it one of the most effective yet challenging herbicides the company has developed.

“It was difficult because it combines four active ingredients in different forms – a salt, two acids and an oil,” Lehman says. “Our team used various advanced formulation tactics to provide the stability and handling performance our customers require.”

Product formulations are important for growers to consider in the process of selecting herbicides, he says because they often differ between branded products and generics.

“A lot of what formulation chemists and engineers do is fight gravity by manipulating how solids and liquids interact,” he says.

While the product was available for application on a limited basis this season, company officials anticipate Acuron GT will be available for wide-scale use by farmers in 44 states for 2022.

New Holland Launches NutriSense Nutrient Analysis Technology Enhancements

Farmers are constantly looking for ways to do more with less: improve the quality of their crop while optimizing the use of inputs, preserving the health of the soil and reducing the environmental impact of their activities. It’s a delicate balancing act where advanced technologies can make all the difference.

New Holland’s NutriSense) system is one of them: awarded the Silver Medal at the SIMA Innovation Awards 2021, this innovation provides farmers with valuable measurements of crop moisture, starch, crude protein, fiber (ADF and NDF), ash and crude fat content in every area of their field. The farmer can visualize this agronomic data with an intuitive, user-friendly interface on their MyPLM Connect portal and use it to make informed decisions that will enable them to market their crops most profitably.

Eduardo Nicz, PLM Product Marketing Global, explains: “Our strategy at New Holland is to integrate digital technologies to deliver a smart and connected agriculture to our customers, with easy-to-use solutions. The NutriSense system is an excellent example: it provides farmers with detailed agronomic data collected by their New Holland combine or forage harvesters in the field. This will enable them to use their inputs most efficiently and harvest a crop they will sell at better prices.”

The NutriSense system on New Holland’s FR Forage Cruiser can help the livestock farmer or contractor in different phases of the farming cycle, starting from understanding and managing field health and performance using year-on-year field data. They can also use the measurements collected by the machine to determine if there is soil contamination in the forage, so they can add a safeguard for the livestock.

At harvest time, the crop moisture data supports the farmer’s decision making on animal feed storage. The crude protein, crude fat and starch content of the crop enables them to improve the animal feed ration content and quality. The result is a healthier, more productive field and high-quality animal feed for the farmer’s livestock or for the contractor to sell at a higher price.

Cash crop farmers operating a New Holland CR or a CX7 and CX8 Combine with NutriSense will benefit too from the year-on-year field data to manage the health and performance of their fields. Understanding the crop protein levels across their field can be very useful when calculating fertilizer application rates for the following seasons, optimizing the use of inputs. The protein content in the grain enables the farmer to determine whether the crop is suitable for animal feed or for milling wheat, which sells at a higher price.

Knowing the value of their crop at harvest will also help them decide how to store the crop. The levels of crop nutrients such as starch also determine whether the crop is suitable for bio-fuel production. With the increasing demand for this sustainable fuel, this can represent an interesting revenue stream.

Lars Skjoldager Sørensen, Crop Harvesting Product Management Global, comments: “New Holland CR, CX7 and CX8 combines deliver massive capacity with outstanding grain quality. The NutriSense system gives our customers an additional advantage: the detailed information on nutrients enables them to optimize the use of inputs, determine the best way to manage their crop, and understand value of their crop to obtain the best price for it.”

Visualization of data from the NutriSense system is the latest addition to the continually expanding array of features and functionalities of the MyPLM Connect Farm app designed to help farmers optimize the performance, productivity and profitability of their operation.

Bayer’s Paul Nelson Named Seed World’s “2021 Future Giant Of Seed Industry”

Seed World magazine is excited to announce the 2021 Future Giant of the Seed Industry Paul Nelson. He serves as a corn product design lead at Bayer and was selected for this award because of his leadership and vision for the future of plant breeding.

For the past 10 years, the Seed World editorial board honors an individual who has demonstrated excellence in their field of work, a commitment to the seed industry and leadership above and beyond the job description.

“I have worked with Paul for over ten years, the last five as the leader of the team that Paul is a part of,” says Jonathan Jenkinson, head of product design at Bayer. “There are few people I’ve known in my career who have added as much or been a greater pleasure to work with. I believe Paul is very worthy of this award.”

Starting his career as a corn breeder in Iowa, Nelson spent eight years managing a breeding program for central corn belt maturities.

“That was my dream job,” Nelson says, “everything from walking plots and managing nurseries to slogging through data during harvest, but when I was presented with opportunities to influence at a broader level, I made the tough decision to ‘hang up the boots’ and move into leadership.”

Now based in Chesterfield, Mo., Nelson has lead teams in data science, genomic prediction, and is now managing one of Bayer’s global breeding pipelines.

In addition to leading his team of scientists at Bayer, focused on developing new corn hybrids for growers, Paul is also actively engaged across the seed industry. He chaired the American Seed trade Association’s molecular marker working group for five years where he coordinated research and publications from that group, has influenced international plant intellectual property (IP) policy at UPOV and ISF, and currently sits on the U.S. Plant Variety Protection Board. Through these efforts, he has helped breeders to achieve more efficient and quicker IP for improved maize hybrids and soybeans varieties.

“What makes a good leader is someone who’s less focused on position and moving up, but instead is passionate about the science and focused on the people they lead,” Nelson says. “When I started my career all I cared about was seeing hybrids from my own breeding program on farmer’s fields; that was highly motivating and a lot of fun. But through different opportunities my career has taken an exciting path away from an individual breeding program. Now, I’m able to influence strategy and lead a team that gets the most out of our data and germplasm and allows us to create even better product for our growers. I’m very fortunate to be where I am today.”

Nufarm Announces Launch Of Leopard Herbicide

Nufarm Americas Inc. is pleased to announce the launch of Leopard™ Herbicide. Leopard is the latest in Nufarm’s portfolio of innovative herbicides formulated to deliver exceptional planting flexibility for soybeans, field corn and cotton.

Leopard’s dual-active formulation boosts foliar activity and adds residual to burndown applications, so fields stay clean up to planting. Leopard lets you keep your crop options open – so you can make crop decisions based on weather conditions and commodity price fluctuation.

“Based on SU chemistry, and with a superior granular formulation, Leopard provides growers with another fall or early spring option in their efforts to manage herbicide resistance, particularly prior to planting soybeans, corn and cotton,” said Chris Bowley, Customer & Brand Marketing Manager. “With excellent residual activity, Leopard is an ideal tank-mix partner for many foundational burndown products. Also, the label allows corn growers even more flexibility as the application window for corn extends all the way up to planting.”

As mentioned, Leopard is a highly compatible tank-mix partner for burndown herbicides like glyphosate and 2,4-D due to its low-use rate. It may be applied 30 to 45 days prior to planting for increased cropping flexibility – and is available for purchase from Nufarm Channel partners commencing mid-July.

Leopard herbicide is the latest addition to the Nufarm’s growing list of herbicides that farmers can use for weed management year round, from “Harvest to Canopy™”. For information about all of the crop protection solutions available from Nufarm, visit nufarm.com/uscrop.

About Nufarm

Established in Australia more than 100 years ago, Nufarm is recognized as one of the leading manufacturers and suppliers of crop protection and seed treatment in the world. In the US, Nufarm is committed to bringing innovation and choice to distributors, retailers and the growers they serve from three state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities located to serve the North American channel with planning and precision.

Corteva Agriscience Leveraging Mobile Robots To Walk Row Crops

Corteva Agriscience is working to take agricultural robotics to new heights using a Spot robot from Boston Dynamics. The company is among the first in agriculture to use this platform to ‘walk’ between rows of corn, sunflowers and other crops.

The robot has potential applications in field testing of both new seed and crop protection solutions with its ability to autonomously collect data, support the application of new crop protection discovery molecules, and inspect operations.

Spot’s many capabilities can help Corteva better understand complex phenotypes to support its research and development selection processes. Spot robots automate sensing and inspection, capture data, and explore without boundaries, making operations safer, more efficient and predictable.

Corteva is also collaborating with Trimble for the initial proof-of-concept and to integrate precise GPS guidance technologies with the platform. The jointly developed solution combines the mobility of the Spot robot with Trimble’s autonomous navigation capabilities and Corteva’s approach to helping farmers overcome agriculture’s most pressing challenges.

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